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Slide 24

    TEXT VERSION OF SLIDE:

    Title: Hazard Prevention and Control: Post-Incident Response Procedures
    Type: Text and Picture Slide
    Content:
    • Get medical help for injured victims
    • Report incident to police and other autorities
    • Inform management about the incident
    • Secure the premises to safeguard evidence
    • Prepare incident report immediately
    • Several types of assistance can be incorporated into post-incident responses:
      • Trauma crisis counseling
      • Critical incident stress debriefing
      • Employee assistance programs
    [Includes two photos. First photo is a colloge with two scenes: one depicting a doctor examing a female patient, and a man in a wheelchair exiting an elevator. Second photo is of two business men talking.]

    Speaker Notes: Other administrative controls include developing and implementing procedures for the correct use of physical barriers, such as enclosures and pass-through windows; developing and implementing emergency procedures for workers to use in case of a robbery or security; and require workers to report all assaults or threats to a supervisor or manager.

    Administrative controls worker only if they are followed. Employers should monitor workers regularly to ensure that proper work practices are being used.

    Victims of workplace violence suffer a variety of consequences, in addition, to their actual physical injuries. These may include:
    • Short-term and long-term psychological trauma
    • Fear of returning to work
    • Changes in relationships with coworkers and family
    • Feelings of incompetence, guilt, powerlessness
    • Feel of criticism by supervisors or managers
    Consequently, a strong follow-up program for these workers will not only help them to deal with these problems, but also help prepare to confront or prevent future incidents of violence.



Page last updated: 03/15/2010