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Electrical

Overview

Working with electricity can be dangerous. Engineers, electricians, and other professionals work with electricity directly, including working on overhead lines, cable harnesses, and circuit assemblies. Others, such as office workers and sales people, work with electricity indirectly and may also be exposed to electrical hazards.

Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard. OSHA's electrical standards are designed to protect employees exposed to dangers such as electric shock, electrocution, fires, and explosions.

Standards

Electrical is addressed in specific OSHA standards for general industry and maritime.

Visit the Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution Standard Page
for information on the final rule.

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Construction

Electricity has long been recognized as a serious workplace hazard. OSHA's electrical standards are designed to protect employees exposed to dangers such as electric shock, electrocution, fires, and explosions. Includes references that provide information related to electrical in construction including OSHA's electrical construction regulations, hazard recogition, possible solutions and additional resources.

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Hazard Recognition

Many workers are unaware of the potential electrical hazards present in their work environment, which makes them more vulnerable to the danger of electrocution. The following hazards are the most frequent causes of electrical injuries: contact with power lines, lack of ground-fault protection, path to ground missing or discontinuous, equipment not used in manner prescribed, and improper use of extension and flexible cords.

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Possible Solutions

A variety of possible solutions may be implemented to reduce or eliminate the risk of injury associated with electrical work. Examples of solutions include the use of insulation, guarding, grounding, electrical protective devices, and safe work practices. This page provides information that may aid in controlling electrical hazards in the workplace.

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Training

When employees are trained to work safely, through the requirements, they should be able to anticipate and avoid injury from job related hazards.

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Additional Resources

Sources that provide helpful information about electrical in the workplace.

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