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Field Label Abbreviations & Descriptions


Editorial Note: The Chemical Sampling Information (CSI) is a continuing work-in-progress. The format and information will change periodically. We will strive to keep up with the ever changing worlds of technology, chemistry, and toxicology.

If you find any inconsistencies between our information and the accepted norm, please let us know.

Background

General Description

Exposure Limits

Health Factors

Monitoring Methods used by OSHA

General References

Search Chemical Sampling Information

Index

By Name

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

By CAS Number
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** All Trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Background

This file presents, in concise form, data on a large number of chemical substances that may be encountered in industrial hygiene investigations. It is intended as a basic reference for OSHA personnel. Labels are shown bolded throughout this document.

General Description

Name, the substances are primarily listed by the Chemical name as it appears in the OSHA PELs, 29 CFR 1910.1000, TABLES Z-1-A, Z-2, Z-3; the ACGIH TLV's; or by common name.

Synonym(s), only the more common synonyms are included. Sources: OSHA PELs, 29 CFR 1910.1000; ACGIH TLV List; and NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS).

IMIS, IMIS Code No., the substance code currently assigned by OSHA to each substance. IMIS Codes are used for completion of OSHA-93, OSHA-98, OSHA-91(S), and OSHA-170. IMIS Codes are also reported on pre-printed OSHA-91B when only field measurements such as gravimetric are reported.

CAS, CAS numbers, Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number. Sources: NIOSH RTECS; EPA TSCA Inventory.

NIOSH, NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) Identification Number.

DOT, Department of Transportation Regulation Number (49 CFR 172.101) and Guide, as listed in the Department of Transportation Regulations (49 CFR 172.101) and NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards.

Description, Chemical Description and Physical Properties, extracted from MERCK Index; Condensed Chemical Dictionary; and NIOSH/OSHA Health Guidelines.

MW: molecular weight
VP: vapor pressure, (mm = mm Hg at 20°C or other specific temperature listed, also 1 mm Hg = 1.333224 E+2 Pa)
ATM: atmosphere, 760 mmHg at 0°C
UEL: upper explosibility limit
SP GR: specific gravity
MOLFM: molecular formula
BP: boiling point
FP: flash point

INCOM, potentially hazardous incompatibilities. Sources: NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards and Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs).

Exposure Limits

OSHA General Industry PEL OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for the General Industry - Action Level, Excursion Limit (EL), 8-Hour Time Weighted Average (TWA), Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), Ceiling, or Stayed. Includes all changes to 29 CFR 1910.1000 to end published in the Federal Register.

OSHA Construction Industry PEL OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for the Construction Industry - Action Level, Excursion Limit (EL), 8-Hour Time Weighted Average (TWA), Short Term Exposure Limit (STEL), Ceiling, or Stayed. Includes all changes to 29 CFR 1926.1100 to end published in the Federal Register.

ACGIH TLV, American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV). Includes Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs), Sensitization, and Skin notations. For current information, references, and footnotes, see the yearly printed ACGIH TLV® and BEIs® Booklet.

NIOSH REL, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limit (REL).

AIHA Weel, American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) Workplace Environmental Exposure Limits (WEEL).

Health Factors

The Office of Occupational Medicine is currently reviewing and updating this section for specific chemicals.

NTP, carcinogenic classification as listed in or prior to the National Toxicology Program's (NTP) Report on Carcinogens (RoC) (latest edition). Search NTP for updated information.

    Known To Be Human Carcinogens (also known as HUMAN CARCINOGEN) (PDF):

    There is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in humans*, which indicates a causal relationship between exposure to the agent, substance, or mixture, and human cancer.

    Reasonably Anticipated to be Human Carcinogens (also know as SUSPECT HUMAN CARCINOGEN) (PDF):
    There is limited evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in humans*, which indicates that causal interpretation is credible, but that alternative explanations, such as chance, bias, or confounding factors, could not adequately be excluded,

    or

    there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity from studies in experimental animals, which indicates there is an increased incidence of malignant and/or a combination of malignant and benign tumors (1) in multiple species or at multiple tissue sites, or (2) by multiple routes of exposure, or (3) to an unusual degree with regard to incidence, site, or type of tumor, or age at onset,

    or

    there is less than sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans or laboratory animals; however, the agent, substance, or mixture belongs to a well-defined, structurally related class of substances whose members are listed in a previous Report on Carcinogens as either known to be a human carcinogen or reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen, or there is convincing relevant information that the agent acts through mechanisms indicating it would likely cause cancer in humans.

    *This evidence can include traditional cancer epidemiology studies, data from clinical studies, and/or data derived from the study of tissues or cells from humans exposed to the substance in question that can be useful for evaluating whether a relevant cancer mechanism is operating in people.

IARC, carcinogenic classification as indicated by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of the Carcinogenic Risk to Humans. Data includes chemicals covered through Volume 88.

    Group 1: The agent (mixture) is carcinogenic to humans.

    The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are carcinogenic to humans.

    Group 2

    Group 2A: The agent (mixture) is probably carcinogenic to humans.

    The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are probably carcinogenic to humans.

    Group 2B: The agent (mixture) is possibly carcinogenic to humans.

    The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are possibly carcinogenic to humans.

    Group 3: The agent (mixture or exposure circumstance) is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.

    Group 4: The agent (mixture) is probably not carcinogenic to humans.

Symptom(s), potential symptoms as a result of inhalation, skin absorption, ingestion, or skin or eye contact. As listed in NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NIOSH No. 85-114), condensed from the NIOSH/OSHA Occupational Health Guidelines for Chemical Hazards (NIOSH No. 81-123).

Health Effects, Principal effect(s) of exposure to each substance, listed by OSHA Health Code and Health Effects. Health codes are used in determining if a violation of an air contaminant standard is serious or other-than- serious, based on guidelines in the Field Operations Manual, OSHA Instruction CPL 2.45B, chapter IV. All Health Codes and Health Effects are scheduled to be reviewed and updated under contract. For some chemicals, additional toxicology information has been added from other sources. Abbreviations for this information includes: SKIN IRR = Skin irritation; SKIN ABS = Skin Absorption; INGES ACUTE = Ingestion Acute; and INGES CHRONIC = Ingestion Chronic.

CODE HEALTH EFFECTS

HE1 Cancer---Currently regulated by OSHA as carcinogen
HE2 Chronic (Cumulative) Toxicity---Known or Suspected animal or human carcinogen, mutagen (except Code HE1 chemicals)

HE3 Chronic (Cumulative) Toxicity---Long-term organ toxicity other than nervous, respiratory, hematologic or reproductive
HE4 Acute Toxicity---Short-term high risk effects
HE5 Reproductive Hazards---Teratogenesis or other reproductive impairment

HE6 Nervous System Disturbances---Cholinesterase inhibition
HE7 Nervous System Disturbances---Nervous system effects other than narcosis
HE8 Nervous System Disturbances---Narcosis

HE9 Respiratory Effects Other Than Irritation---Respiratory sensitization (asthma or other)
HE10 Respiratory Effects Other Than Irritation---Cumulative lung damage
HE11 Respiratory Effects---Acute lung damage/edema or other

HE12 Hematologic (Blood) Disturbances---Anemias
HE13 Hematologic (Blood) Disturbances---Methemoglobinemia

HE14 Irritation-Eyes, Nose, Throat, Skin---Marked
HE15 Irritation-Eyes, Nose, Throat, Skin---Moderate
HE16 Irritation-Eyes, Nose, Throat, Skin---Mild

HE17 Asphyxiants, Anoxiants
HE18 Explosive, Flammable, Safety (No adverse effects encountered when good housekeeping practices are followed)
HE19 Generally Low Risk Health Effects---Nuisance particulates, vapors or gases
HE20 Generally Low Risk Health Effects---Odor

Organ, the organs which are affected by exposure to each substance. As listed in NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (NIOSH No. 85-114), condensed from the NIOSH/OSHA Occupational Health Guidelines for Chemical Hazards (NIOSH No. 81-123).

Health Guideline, guidelines summarize pertinent information about chemicals for workers and employers as well as for physicians, industrial hygienists, and other occupational safety and health professionals who may need such information to conduct effective occupational safety and health programs. Recommendations may be superseded by new developments; readers are therefore advised to regard these recommendations as general guidelines and to determine periodically whether new information is available.

Monitoring Methods used by OSHA

Primary Laboratory Sampling/Analytical Method (SLC1), Salt Lake Technical Center sampling method for OSHA compliance.

MEDIA, sampling media.

ANL SOLVENT, Analytical solvent used in referenced method for desorption or extraction. If compounds to be sampled use the same medium and also use the same analytical or alternate solvent, they may be analyzed from the same sample.

ALT SOLVENT, Alternate solvent for desorption or extraction evaluated at the Salt Lake Technical Center. If compounds to be sampled use the same medium and also use the same analytical or alternate solvent, they may be analyzed from the same sample.

Volumes listed are guidelines but should not be exceeded for solid sorbents.

  • MAX V, maximum volume
  • MAX F, maximum flow rate
  • MIN V, minimum volume
  • REC V, recommended volume
  • REC F, recommended flow rate
  • MIN T, minimum time
  • CAPTURE R, capture rate

ANL 1, current Salt Lake Technical Center analytical method

ANL A, alternate Salt Lake Technical Center analytical method

REF, method reference. (numbered, as listed in both SLC1 and SAM2)

  1. NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods (NMAM®), 4th Ed., US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication no. 94-113 (August, 1994); 1st Supplement, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication no. 96-135; 2nd Supplement, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication no. 98-119; and 3rd Supplement, DHHS (NIOSH) Publication no. 2003-154; Schlecht, P.C. and O'Connor, P.F., (pfo1@cdc.gov) Eds. Also, NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods, 2nd Ed., Volume 1-7, Taylor, D.G., Ed. DHHS (NIOSH), Cincinnati, Ohio. Current NIOSH methods are available online.
  2. OSHA Manual of Analytical Methods , USDOL, OSHA Salt Lake Technical Center (SLTC), 8660 South Sandy Parkway, Sandy, UT 84070-6406. Sampling and Analytical Methods are available at this website.
  3. McLean, J.D. and Holland, J.F.: Development of a Portable Polarograph for Determination of Aldehydes in Automotive Exhaust and Production Plant Samples. Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 9, pp. 127-131, (1975).
  4. Mattocks, A.R.: Spectrophotometric Determination of Pyrazoline and Some Acrylic Amides and Esters. Anal. Chem., Vol. 40, pp. 1347, (1968).
  5. Analysis of Pesticide Residues in Human and Environmental Samples. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pesticide and Toxic Substances Effects Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, N.C., (1974).
  6. Orion Electrode Instruction Manual. Orion Research, Inc., Cambridge, Mass., (1971).
  7. Thomsen, E. and Stern, R.M.: A Simple Analytical Technique for the Determination of Hexavalent Chromium in Welding Fumes and other Complex Materials. The Danish Welding Institute Report No. 79-01, Scand. J. Work. Environ. & Health, Vol. 5, pp. 386-403, (1979).
  8. The Industrial Environment--Its Evaluation and Control. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Washington, D.C., (1973).
  9. Brief, R.S., Venable, F.L.S., and Ajemian, R.S.: Nickel Carbonyl: Its Detection and Potential for Formation. Amer. Ind. Hyg. Assn. J., Vol. 26, pp. 72-76, (1965).
  10. King, J.R., Nony, C.R., and Boeman, M.C.: Trace Analysis Diethylstilbestrol (DES) in Animal Chow by Parallel High-Speed Liquid Chromatography, Electron-Capture Gas Chromatography, and Radioassays. J. Chromatographic Science, Vol. 15, pp. 14, (1977).
  11. OSHA Technical Manual (OTM), OSHA Instruction CPL 2-2.20B, USDOL OSHA Directorate of Technical Support, Washington, D.C. (1990). Current OSHA Technical Manual (OTM) (TED 01-00-015 [TED 1-0.15A]) is available at this website.
  12. Occupational Exposure Sampling Strategy Manual (77-173), US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Cincinnati, Ohio, (1977).
  13. Brief, R.S., Ajemian, R.S., and Confer, R.G.: Iron Pentacarbonyl: Its Toxicity, Detection, and Potential for Formation. Amer. Ind. Hyg. Assn. J., Vol. 28, pp. 21-30, (1967).
  14. Wisconsin Occupational Health Laboratory (WOHL), 2601 Agriculture Drive, Madison, Wis. 53718, (800)446-0403. There are several substances in which WOHL methods differ from the OSHA method or an OSHA method does not exist. For more information concerning these methods, please contact WOHL
  15. U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 29, Part 1910, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
  16. Eller, P.E.: Determination of Nickel Carbonyl by charcoal tube collection and furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Appl. Ind. Hyg. (1)3, pp 115-118, (1986, Sept).
  17. Follow Manufacturer's Instruction Sheet. The Salt Lake Technical Center has not evaluated this product.

SAE, Sampling and Analytical Error. SAE is a measure of the precision and accuracy of the combined sampling and analytical process. The SAEs in this file are historical in nature and are not valid for current use. For current SAEs, contact the laboratory that analyzed your samples.

CLASS, method classifications.

The following method status classifications have been assigned to OSHA methods. Some of the classifications are obsolete, but will be encountered in various OSHA methods. NIOSH method classification is taken from the method evaluation status published in their methods.

Fully Validated: sampling and analytical methods that have been thoroughly evaluated for sampler capacity, analytical recovery, storage stability, precision, and limits of detection and quantitation by following established OSHA methods evaluation guidelines
Partially Validated: sampling and analytical methods that have been partially evaluated for sampler capacity, analytical recovery, storage stability, precision, and limit of quantitation by following established OSHA methods evaluation guidelines
Validated: similar to Fully Validated
Validated Analytical Method: analytical method that was thoroughly evaluated. The sampling method was not tested.
Stopgap: similar to Partially Validated
Not Validated: literature review and very limited or no evaluation data.

Note special instructions on sampling or obtaining sampling media from the Salt Lake Technical Center. These instruction pertain to OSHA and 18(b) or 7(c)(1) state programs.

Secondary Laboratory Sampling/Analytical Method (SAM2), Detector Tubes and Direct reading instrument information has not been reviewed, except as noted.

ANL, any analytical method used in conjunction with a secondary sampling method. Some of these are NIOSH methods which are not in use by the Salt Lake Technical Center.

For other subheadings see Primary Sampling/Analytical Method (SLC1) above.

DET TUBE, Detector Tubes are used for screening to determine whether additional sampling is needed. If detector tube readings exceed 1/2 the PEL, CSHOs should sample with the SLC1 method, if available. Under certain conditions, detector tubes can be used for compliance purposes. Contact the Salt Lake Technical Center for further information.

    NOTE: OSHA has evaluated detector tubes for internal use; however, the number and type of tubes is limited. OSHA evaluates detector tubes primarily to select tubes for OSHA use. OSHA does not certify detector tubes, nor endorse products of any manufacturer. The Safety Equipment Institute certifies detector tubes and more information regarding their program can be found at their www.seinet.org site. Omission of other manufacturers tubes does not mean the tubes have been found unsatisfactory.

COND, used primarily to specify HPLC conditions for the purpose of grouping chemicals together for analysis.

ART, Articles from published literature which may be prospective starting points for sampling or analysis of the chemical of interest.

WIPE, Indicates whether wipe samples can be used. For some chemicals, specific filter and solvent information is included. Information in this field has not been extensively reviewed.

Generel References

Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 29 Part 1910, USDOL, OSHA, Washington, D.C. Also available U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, Fourteenth Edition, Van Nostrand Co., New York, 2001.

IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. (90+ volumes). Available WHO Publications Centre USA, 49 Sheridan Ave., Albany, N.Y. 12210.

The Merck Index, Fourteenth Edition, Merck & Co., Rahway, N.J., 2006.

NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects, US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Cincinnati, OH. Available U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards, US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Cincinnati, OH. September, 2005, DHHS (NIOSH) 2005-149. Available U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.

NIOSH/OSHA Health Guidelines, US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Washington, D.C., January, 1981, DHHS (NIOSH) No. 81-123. Available U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Current listing of NIOSH Health Guidelines.

Report on Carcinogens (RoC). US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Toxicology Program (NTP), (latest edition), Washington, D.C.

Toxic Substances Control Act Inventory, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington, D.C. Additional information is available online from EPA.


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