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Chemical Sampling Information (CSI)
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General Description

Synonyms: Uranium metal: Uranium I; Synonyms of other insoluble uranium compounds vary depending upon the specific compound

OSHA IMIS Code Number: 2560

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number: 7440-61-1

NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) Identification Number: YR3490000

Department of Transportation Regulation Number (49 CFR 172.101) and Guide: 2979 162 (metal, pyrophoric)

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards, Uranium (insoluble compounds, as U): chemical description, physical properties, potentially hazardous incompatibilities, and more

Exposure Limits

OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL):

General Industry: 29 CFR 1910.1000 Z-1 Table -- 0.25 mg/m3 TWA

Maritime: 29 CFR 1915.1000 Table Z-Shipyards -- 0.2 mg/m3 TWA

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV): 0.2 mg/m3 TWA; 0.6 mg/m3 STEL; Appendix A1 - Confirmed Human Carcinogen

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limit (REL): 0.2 mg/m3 TWA; 0.6 mg/m3 STEL; Appendix A - NIOSH Potential Occupational Carcinogens

Health Factors

NIOSH Immediately Dangerous To Life or Health Concentration (IDLH): 10 mg U/m3

Potential Symptoms: Increased urinary excretion of uranium from shrapnel in tissues; elevated prolactin level (upper end of normal range); In animals: lung, lymph node damage, dermatitis (carcinogenic)

Health Effects: Cumulative kidney damage/lung accumulation (HE3)

Affected Organs: Skin, kidneys, bone marrow, lymphatic system

Notes:

  1. Lower performance on computerized tests assessing performance efficiency was associated with elevated urine uranium levels in Gulf War veterans with shrapnel from munitions or armor made from depleted uranium (DU) in one study, but not confirmed in subsequent follow-up.
  2. Rats implanted with DU pellets show marked accumulation of uranium in kidneys, bone and teeth, with lesser accumulation in liver, spleen, and brain.
  3. Possible radiation-related effects likely due to decay products, especially radon.

Literature Basis:

  • Bleise, A., Danesi, P.R. and Burkart, W.: Properties, use and health effects of depleted uranium (DU): a general overview. J. Environ. Radioac. 64: 93-112, 2003.
  • Bolton, J.P.G. and Foster, C.R.M.: Battlefield use of depleted uranium and the health of veterans. J. R. Army Med. Corps 148: 221-230, 2002.
  • McDiarmid, M.A., et al.: Health effects of depleted uranium on exposed Gulf War veterans. Environ. Res. 82(2): 168-180, 2000.
  • Pellmar, T.C., et al.: Distribution of uranium in rats implanted with depleted uranium pellets. Toxicol. Sci. 49: 29-39, 1999.

Date Last Revised: 08/18/2003

Monitoring Methods used by OSHA

Primary Laboratory Sampling/Analytical Method (SLC1):

  • sampling media: Mixed Cellulose Ester Filter (MCEF) 0.8 microns
    maximum volume: 960 Liters
    minimum volume: 480 Liters
    maximum flow rate: 2.0 L/min (TWA)
    maximum volume: 30 Liters
    maximum flow rate: 2.0 L/min (STEL)
    current analytical method: Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma; ICP/DCP-AES
    method reference: OSHA (In-House File)
    method classification: Not Validated
    note: Submit as a separate sample. If the filter is not overloaded, samples may be collected up to an 8-hour period.

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