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Chemical Sampling Information (CSI)
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General Description

Synonyms: Triatomic oxygen

OSHA IMIS Code Number: 1980

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number: 10028-15-6

NIOSH Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) Identification Number: RS8225000

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards - Ozone: Physical description, chemical properties, potentially hazardous incompatibilities, and more



Exposure Limits and Health Effects

Exposure Limit

Limit Values

HE Codes

Health Factors and Target Organs

OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) - General Industry
See 29 CFR 1910.1000 Table Z-1

0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3) TWA

HE7

Headache
Target organs: Brain, central nervous system

HE10 Lung damage, chronic respiratory disease
HE11 Pulmonary congestion, edema, and hemorrhage
HE14 Eye, nose, throat, and respiratory irritation

OSHA PEL - Construction Industry
See 29 CFR 1926.55 Appendix A

0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3) TWA

HE7

Headache
Target organs: Brain, central nervous system

HE10 Lung damage, chronic respiratory disease
HE11 Pulmonary congestion, edema, and hemorrhage
HE14 Eye, nose, throat, and respiratory irritation

OSHA PEL - Shipyard Employment
See 29 CFR 1915.1000 Table Z-Shipyards

0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3) TWA

HE7

Headache
Target organs: Brain, central nervous system

HE10 Lung damage, chronic respiratory disease
HE11 Pulmonary congestion, edema, and hemorrhage
HE14 Eye, nose, throat, and respiratory irritation

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limit (REL)

0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3) Ceiling

HE7

Headache
Target organs: Brain, central nervous system

HE10 Lung damage, chronic respiratory disease
HE11 Pulmonary congestion, edema, and hemorrhage
HE14 Eye, nose, throat, and respiratory irritation

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV) (2001)

Heavy work: 0.05 ppm
(0.1 mg/m3)
8-hour TWA

Moderate work:
0.08 ppm
(0.16 mg/m3)
8-hour TWA

Light work:
0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3)
8-hour TWA

All workloads:
0.2 ppm
(0.39 mg/m3)
2-hour TWA

A4

HE7

Headache
Target organs: Brain, central nervous system

HE10 Lung damage, chronic respiratory disease
HE11 Pulmonary congestion, edema, and hemorrhage
HE14 Eye, nose, throat, and respiratory irritation
CAL/OSHA PELs

0.1 ppm
(0.2 mg/m3)
TWA

0.3 ppm
(0.6 mg/m3) STEL

HE10

Lung damage and decreased lung function

National Toxicology Program (NTP) carcinogenic classification: Not listed

International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC): Not listed

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carcinogenic classification: Not listed

EPA Inhalation Reference Concentration (RfC): Not established

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Inhalation Minimal Risk Level (MRL): Not established

NIOSH Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) concentration: 5 ppm

Notes on Other Potential Health Effects and Hazards

  1. Ozone can increase sensitivity to bronchoconstrictors and allergens and may facilitate the development of asthma. In fact, thunderstorm events (when pollen and ozone are at higher levels), have coincided with up to 10-fold increases in asthma hospital admissions (Anderson et al. 2001).
  2. Systemically, ozone has been reported to mimic the effects of ionizing radiation, including damage to chromosomal structures. There does, however, appear to be a partial tolerance to this with repeated exposure (NIOSH 1978).
  3. In bleachery workers, exhaled nitric oxide levels could be a marker for airway inflammation after exposure to high peaks of ozone (Olin et al. 2004).

Date last revised: 09/06/2012

Literature Basis

  • ACGIH: Documentation of the Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) and Biological Exposure Indices (BEIs) - Ozone. 2001.
  • Anderson, W., Prescott, G.J., Packham, S., Mullins, J., Brookes, M. and Seaton, A.: Asthma admissions and thunderstorms: a study of pollen, fungal spores, rainfall, and ozone. QJM 94(8): 429-433, 2001.
  • California Occupational Safety & Health Standards Board: Initial [123 KB PDF, 19 pages] and Final [318 KB PDF, 55 pages] Statement of Reasons. August 3, 2010.
  • NIOSH: Occupational Health Guideline for Ozone. September 1978.
  • NIOSH/IPCS: International Chemical Safety Cards - Ozone. April 26, 1993.
  • Olin, A.C., Andersson, E., Andersson, M., Granung, G., Hagberg, S. and Toren, K.: Prevalence of asthma and exhaled nitric oxide are increased in bleachery workers exposed to ozone. Eur. Respir. J. 23(1): 87-92, 2004.
Monitoring Methods used by OSHA

Laboratory Sampling/Analytical Method:

  • sampling media: Two Impregnated Glass Fiber Filters (37mm polystyrene cassette) coated with a solution containing NaNO2, K2CO3 and Glycerol in water
    maximum volume: 90 Liters
    maximum flow rate: 0.5 L/min
    maximum time: 180 Minutes
    current analytical method: Ion Chromatography; IC
    method reference: OSHA Analytical Method (OSHA 214)
    method classification: Fully Validated
    notes:
    1. If the expected ozone concentration exceeds 0.2 ppm, the recommended maximum sampling rate is 0.25 L/min and the recommended maximum sampling time is 180 min.
    2. Short-term exposures can be monitored with a 15-min sample at maximum flow rate of 1.5 L/min.
    3. Four-hour (480 min) samples can be collected at a maximum flow rate of 0.25 L/min.
    4. OSHA personnel can request the sampling medium from SLTC.
    5. The sampling medium must be used within 30 days of preparation.
    6. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is a sampling interference, and oxidizer tubes must be used if SO2 is suspected to be present.
    7. The sampling medium is shipped from SLTC in cassettes and each cassette is individually sealed in an aluminumized plastic bag to prevent contamination. Each exposed sampler must be returned for analysis also sealed in an aluminumized plastic bag.

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