Valley Fever (Coccidioidomycosis)

Standards

There is no specific OSHA Standard for Valley Fever. However, the General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Act of 1970, 29 USC 654(a)(1) requires employers to furnish each worker "employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm". Employers may be cited where uncontrolled occupational hazards are present, and no other OSHA standard is applicable to address those hazards.

Other applicable OSHA requirements include Respiratory Protection, 29 CFR 1910.134, which covers respirator use in the workplace, and Personal Protective Equipment, 29 CFR 1910.132, which covers a variety of personal protective equipment that may apply to the protection of outdoor workers from environmental hazards such as Coccidioides. The Construction Standard for Personal Protective Equipment, 29 CFR 1926 Subpart E, includes similar requirements that apply specifically to those workers involved in construction activities.

For information about recording, posting, and reporting occupational injuries and illnesses as required by 29 CFR 1904, see OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements.

Section 11(c) of the OSH Act, 29 USC 660(c), prohibits employers from retaliating against workers for raising concerns about unsafe or unhealthful conditions, among other things. OSHA encourages workers who suffer such retaliation to submit a complaint to OSHA. Complaints must be filed within 30 days of the retaliation action.

Depending on the specific work task, setting, and exposure to other biological agents, some OSHA standards and regulations that may apply include:

OSHA Standards
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
Related Information

1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1910.132, General requirements.

Related Information

1910.134, Respiratory protection.

Related Information

1910 Subpart J - General Environmental Controls

1910.141, Sanitation.

Related Information

1910 Subpart K - Medical and First Aid

1910.151(c), Medical services and first aid.

Related Information

1910 Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances

1910.1020, Access to employee exposure and medical records.

Related Information
Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (29 CFR 1904)
Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses (29 CFR 1904)
Related Information

1904 Subpart C - Recordkeeping Forms and Recording Criteria

1904.4, Recording criteria.

Related Information

1904.4(a), Recording criteria.

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1904.4(b), Recording criteria.

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1904 Subpart E - Reporting Fatality, Injury and Illness Information to the Government

1904.39, Reporting fatalities, hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye as a result of work-related incidents to OSHA.

Related Information

1904.40, Providing records to government representatives.

Related Information
Safety and Health Regulations for Construction (29 CFR 1926)
Safety and Health Regulations for Construction (29 CFR 1926)
Related Information

1926 Subpart C - General Safety and Health Provisions

1926.20, General safety and health provisions.

Related Information

1926.28, Personal protective equipment.

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1926.33, Access to employee exposure and medical records.

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1926 Subpart D - Occupational Health and Environmental Controls

1926.51, Sanitation.

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1926 Subpart E - Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

1926.103, Respiratory protection.

Related Information
Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Agriculture (29 CFR 1928)
Occupational Safety and Health Standards for Agriculture (29 CFR 1928)
Related Information

1928 Subpart I - General Environmental Controls

1928.110, Field Sanitation.

Related Information

*Authority for enforcing agriculture’s field sanitation standards in most states has been delegated to the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. Department of Labor (see WHD Fact Sheet).

State Plan Standards

There are 29 OSHA-approved State Plans operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

California’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) requires that construction employers train workers about Valley Fever prevention in highly endemic counties as per California Labor Code, Section 6709.

Additional Directives

Note: The directives in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.