Spray Operations

Standards

Spray operations are addressed in specific OSHA standards for the general industry, maritime, and construction. This section highlights OSHA standards and documents related to spray operations.

OSHA Standards
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
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1910 Subpart G - Occupational Health and Environmental Control

1910.94, Ventilation.

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1910 Subpart H - Hazardous Materials

1910.107, Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials.

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1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1910.133, Eye and face protection.

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1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

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1910 Subpart R - Special Industries

1910.269, Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution.

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Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
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1915 Subpart C - Surface Preparation and Preservation

1915.35, Painting.

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1917 Subpart G - Related Terminal Operations and Equipment

1917.153, Spray painting (See also §1917.2, definition of Hazardous cargo, materials, substance, or atmosphere).

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1917.158, Prohibited operations.

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1918 Subpart I

1918.96, Maintenance and repair work in the vicinity of longshoring operations.

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Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)
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1926 Subpart D

1926.57, Ventilation.

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1926.60, Methylenedianiline.

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1926.62, Lead.

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1926.66, Criteria for design and construction of spray booths.

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1926 Subpart E - Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

1926.103, Respiratory protection.

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1926 Subpart F - Fire Protection and Prevention

1926.152, Flammable liquids.

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1926 Subpart I - Tools - Hand and Power

1926.302, Power-operated hand tools.

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1926 Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances

1926.1127, Cadmium.

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State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

Additional Directives

Note: The directives in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.