Combustible Dust: An Explosion Hazard

Standards

The following Federal OSHA standards are mandatory; they include provisions that address certain aspects of combustible dust hazards. Some are industry-wide and others and industry-specific.

OSHA Standards

Highlighted Standards

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
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1910 Subpart D - Walking-Working Surfaces

1910.22, General requirements.

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1910 Subpart E - Exit Routes and Emergency Planning

1910.38, Emergency action plans.

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1910 Subpart G - Occupational Health and Environmental Control

1910.94, Ventilation.

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1910 Subpart J - General Environmental Controls

1910.146, Permit-required confined spaces.

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1910 Subpart L - Fire Protection

1910.157, Portable fire extinguishers.

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1910.165, Employee alarm systems.

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1910 Subpart N - Materials Handling and Storage

1910.176, Handling materials - general.

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1910.178, Powered industrial trucks.

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1910 Subpart R - Special Industries

1910.261, Pulp, paper, and paperboard mills.

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1910.263, Bakery equipment.

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1910.265, Sawmills.

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1910.269, Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution.

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1910.272, Grain handling facilities.

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1910 Subpart S - Electrical

1910.307, Hazardous (classified) locations.

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1910 Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances

1910.1200, Hazard Communication.

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State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

General Duty Clause

If a hazard is not addressed by an OSHA standard, Section 5(a)(1) of the OSH Act, often referred to as the General Duty Clause, may apply. This section requires employers to "furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees". This is discussed further in the Consensus Standards section below.