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Dangerous Results of Incorrect Felling

  Barber Chair
  • The splitting of the butt of the log during the latter part of the fall. The tree often remains attached to the stump, thus creating a danger zone and ruining much of the log.
  • Caused by a Dutchman notch.
 
Barber Chair
Barber Chair
Lodged-Trees
Lodged Tree (also called A Hung Tree)
Dutchman's Notch
Dutchman
 
Kickback
Kickback
Stalled-Tree
Stalled Tree

 
 
Throwback
  • Limbs or other material thrown back toward the logger when the falling tree contacts standing trees or fallen trees.
  • Caused by not felling the tree in a clear path or onto a clear landing.
Lodged Tree (also called A Hung Tree)
  • A cut tree that has not fallen completely to the ground, but is lodged or leaning against another tree. This is extremely dangerous. Do NOT work in the presence of hung trees. Have these death-traps pushed or pulled down by a machine.
  • Caused by poor judgment of felling path or inaccurate cutting.
Dutchman
  • The seat that interferes with the smooth closing of the notch.
  • Caused when one of the notch cuts is made too deep and extends beyond the endpoint of the other notch cut, known as "Bypass".
Kickback
  • When a falling tree hits the ground or other object it can bounce back causing the log to move back over the stump with great force. This is the main reason you should never stand or retreat directly behind the tree.
  • Increased chance of kickback by not making the back cut above the notch on a conventional or Humbolt notch.
Stalled Tree
  • A tree that has just begun to fall but is stopped by its own stump. This is almost as dangerous as a lodged tree and requires a machine to push it over.
  • Caused by a Dutchman notch.
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