Nanotechnology

Standards

A variety of companies are researching and developing nanotechnology. Although there are nanomaterials in a few products used in the construction industry, most of these activities fall under OSHA general industry standards. This page highlights some of the applicable general industry OSHA standards.

OSHA Standards

Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 654), often referred to as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to "furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees."
Section 5(a)(2) requires employers to "comply with occupational safety and health standards" promulgated under this Act.

The following are examples of standards that may be applicable in situations where employees are exposed to nanomaterials.

Recordkeeping (29 CFR 1904)
Recordkeeping (29 CFR 1904)
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1904

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General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
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1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1910.132, General requirements.

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1910.133, Eye and face protection.

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1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

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1910.138, Hand Protection.

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1910 Subpart J - General Environmental Controls

1910.141, Sanitation.

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1910 Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances

1910.1027, Cadmium.

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1910.1200, Hazard Communication.

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1910.1450, Occupational exposure to hazardous chemicals in laboratories.

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State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.