Electrical Contractors Industry

Standards

Electrical hazards are addressed in specific OSHA standards for recordkeeping, general industry, maritime, and construction. This section highlights OSHA standards and documents related to the electrical contractors industry.

OSHA Standards

Frequently Cited Standards

OSHA maintains a listing of the most frequently cited standards for specified 6-digit North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) codes. Please refer to OSHA's Frequently Cited OSHA Standards page for additional information. For Electrical Contractors and Other Wiring Installation Contractors use NAICS code 238210 in the NAICS search box.

Other Highlighted Standards

Recordkeeping and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illness (29 CFR 1904)
Recordkeeping and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illness (29 CFR 1904)
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1904

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General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
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1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1910.137, Electrical Protective Equipment.

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1910 Subpart J - General Environmental Controls

1910.147, The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout). See Appendix A for information related to typical minimum lockout procedures.

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1910 Subpart R - Special Industries

1910.269, Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution.

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1910 Subpart S - Electrical

1910.302, Electric utilization systems.

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1910.303, General.

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1910.304, Wiring design and protection.

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1910.305, Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

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1910.306, Specific purpose equipment and installations.

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1910.307, Hazardous (classified) locations.

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1910.308, Special systems.

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1910.331, Scope.

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1910.332, Training.

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1910.333, Selection and use of work practices.

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1910.334, Use of equipment.

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1910.335, Safeguards for personnel protection.

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Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
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1915 Subpart L - Electrical Machinery

1915.181, Electrical circuits and distribution boards.

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1917 Subpart G - Related Terminal Operations and Equipment

1917.157, Battery charging and changing.

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Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)
Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)
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1926 Subpart K - Electrical

1926.402, Applicability.

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1926.403, General requirements.

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1926.404, Wiring design and protection.

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1926.405, Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use.

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1926.406, Specific purpose equipment and installations.

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1926.407, Hazardous (classified) locations.

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1926.408, Special systems.

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1926.416, General requirements.

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1926.417, Lockout and tagging of circuits.

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1926.431, Maintenance of equipment.

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1926.432, Environmental deterioration of equipment.

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1926.441, Batteries and battery charging.

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State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

Additional Directives

Note: The directives in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.

National Consensus

Note: These are NOT OSHA regulations. However, they do provide guidance from their originating organizations related to worker protection.

American National Standards Institute (ANSI)