OSHA Field Safety and Health Management System (SHMS) Manual

CHAPTER 8. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

  1. Purpose

    The objective of this Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Program is to provide guidance and promote the accountability needed to protect employees from the risk of injury by creating a barrier against workplace hazards, by use of PPE. PPE will be provided, used, and maintained by all staff when it has been determined that its use will lessen the likelihood of occupational injury and/or illness. PPE is to be used in conjunction with other controls for safety and health. It is considered to be the last line of defense against injury and illness and acceptable when controls higher in the hierarchy don’t eliminate the hazard or are in development. It is not to be relied on solely without first utilizing engineering or administrative controls, if possible.

  2. Scope

    The program applies to all employees within a regional, area, district or satellite OSHA office and other OSHA organizational units (i.e., Cincinnati Technical Center, Salt Lake Technical Center, OSHA Training Institute) covered by the OSHA Field SHMS Program who are required or prefer to wear PPE. This program addresses all forms of PPE, except hearing protection, fall protection, respiratory protection, bloodborne pathogens protection and electrical safety protection, which are addressed in separate SHMS Manual chapters: Chapter 16 – Hearing Conservation Program, Chapter 17 – Fall Protection, Chapter 18 – Respiratory Protection, Chapter 19 – Bloodborne Pathogens and Chapter 22 – Electrical Safety.

  3. References
    1. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E – 2021, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace.

    2. NFPA 2112 – 2018, Standard on Flame-Resistant Clothing for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Short-Duration Thermal Exposures from Fire.

    3. NFPA 2113 – 2020, Standard on Selection, Care, Use, and Maintenance of Flame-Resistant Garments for Protection of Industrial Personnel Against Thermal Exposures from Fire.

    4. American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) 107 – 2015, American National Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Accessories.

    5. ANSI Z41 – 1999, American National Standard for Personal Protection – Protective Footwear.

    6. ANSI/ISEA Z87.1 – 2020, American National Standard Occupational and Educational Personal Eye and Face Protection Devices.

    7. ANSI/ISEA 105 – 2016, American National Standard for Hand Protection Classification.

  4. Definitions

    Arc Flash Clothing (AFC) – protective clothing used to protect personnel from possible injury or death to health associated with the release of energy caused by an electric arc. (See Chapter 22 -Electrical Safety).

    Flame Resistant Clothing (FRC) – protective clothing used to protect personnel from possible injury or death in the event of a short duration of thermal exposure from fire.

    Hard Hat – Head protection meeting ANSI Z89.1; Class C (Conductive) hard hats do not offer electrical protection, Class G (General) hard hats are rated for 2,200 volts, Class E (Electrical) hard hats are rated for 20,000 volts.

    Level B suit – Protective suit that provides liquid splash protection but not protection against vapors. This level is used when identified hazardous materials do not require a high level of skin protection. Ex. Disposable chemical resistant coveralls.

    Potentially injurious light radiation (light radiation) – intense radiant energy or radiation, such as radiation that is produced by electric arc welding and gas torching operations. (29 CFR 1915.153)

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation – radiation contained in sunlight that causes premature aging of the skin, wrinkles, cataracts and skin cancer.

  5. Responsibilities
    1. The OSHA Manager(s) have the primary responsibility for implementation of the PPE Program in their work area and will:

      1. Have access to the Agency Loan Equipment Program (ALEP) and the Agency Expendable Supplies Program (AESP);

      2. Provide appropriate PPE and make it available to employees;

      3. Ensure and certify that staff complete a Hazard Assessment, which includes a PPE assessment, at the beginning of employment and prior to any inspection or site visit;

      4. Ensure employees are trained on the proper use, care, and cleaning of PPE;

      5. Maintain records of employee training on proper use and care of PPE and the PPE supplied to employees;

      6. Supervise employees to ensure that the PPE Program elements are followed and that employees properly use and care for PPE;

      7. Ensure defective or damaged PPE is immediately removed from service;

      8. Ensure proper disposal and cleaning of contaminated PPE; and

      9. Designate a PPE coordinator to supervise the distribution, maintenance, including repair and calibration, and care of all PPE.

    2. OSHA employees are responsible for complying with the requirements of this policy and will:

      1. Wear PPE as necessary;

      2. Attend PPE training sessions;

      3. Care for, clean, maintain and dispose of PPE as necessary; and

      4. Report any damaged or defective PPE to their responsible OSHA Manager(s).

  6. Procedure
    1. Hazard Assessment

      Based on a general assessment of all work sites and new job tasks, it is OSHA’s policy that all OSHA employees will wear safety glasses, safety shoes, and hard hats on construction sites, and safety glasses and safety shoes on all general industry sites, at a minimum. OSHA personnel will also abide by any required PPE based on the local office hazard assessment or OSHA Job Hazard Analysis (JHA). (See JHA on SHMS Intranet)

      At the start of any inspection/audit/investigation/evaluation, the OSHA employee will assess the need for PPE, which would include the review of the employer’s PPE policy.

      The OSHA employee will abide by the employer’s or OSHA’s PPE policy, whichever requires the greater protection. In the event that an employer requires and offers necessary PPE that the OSHA employee lacks, the OSHA employee will use professional judgment (or contact their supervisor) to determine if use of the employer’s PPE is appropriate or if they need to reschedule the inspection and return with OSHA-issued PPE.

      If in the course of an inspection/audit/investigation/evaluation, the OSHA employee encounters a hazardous condition requiring the use of PPE not anticipated by the employee’s PPE hazard assessment before the walkaround and not addressed by the employer’s PPE hazard assessment, the OSHA employee will immediately address the hazardous condition with the employer and don the appropriate PPE before proceeding unless other appropriate action eliminates the hazard.

      This chapter, as well as Chapter 16 - Hearing Conservation, Chapter 17 - Fall Protection, Chapter 18 - Respiratory Protection, Chapter 19 - Bloodborne Pathogens, and Chapter 23 - Protection During Incident Investigations, along with any other OSHA JHAs, serve as OSHA’s PPE hazard assessment.

    2. General Requirements
      1. All PPE procured will be designed to meet relevant National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), or other generally accepted industrial standards.

      2. Equipment will be maintained and worn in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.

      3. Care will be taken to ensure that correctly sized PPE is selected.

    3. Eye and Face Protection
      1. During activities requiring the use of eye protection, OSHA employees will be provided with and wear safety glasses with side protection. See Appendix A for Eye and Face Protection Selection.

      2. Based on a hazard assessment, wherever hazards exist that may require additional eye protection, goggles, face shields or other eye protection specific to the hazard will be worn.

      3. Equipment fitted with appropriate filter lenses will be used to protect against light radiation. Tinted and shaded lenses are not filter lenses for light radiation unless they are marked or identified as such.

      4. Equipment fitted with appropriate filter lenses will be used to protect against ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Tinted and shaded lenses are not filter lenses for UV radiation unless they are marked or identified as such.

      5. Prescription Safety Eyewear:

        1. For employees who wear prescription lenses, eye protectors will either incorporate the prescription in the design or fit properly over the prescription lenses.

        2. Prescription safety glasses will be supplied to OSHA employees in accordance with the current negotiated agreement with the National Council of Field Labor Locals (NCFLL).

      6. See Appendix B, Memorandum for Reimbursement Limits for Protective Footwear and Safety Glasses, and related resources.

    4. Head Protection
      1. Hard hats equipped with limited dielectric properties will be furnished to and used by all OSHA employees while on construction sites, and where they are required to be worn when hazards from falling or fixed objects or electrical shock are present.

      2. Hard hat liners will be provided to OSHA employees, as appropriate.

    5. Foot Protection
      1. OSHA employees will be furnished with, and are required to wear, ANSI-approved safety shoes or boots at all times during inspections and other on-site visits.

      2. Safety shoes or boots with metatarsal protection will be provided and are required to be worn in work areas where heavy materials could be dropped on the foot (e.g., foundries), and where the employer being inspected requires that such protection be worn.

      3. Each OSHA employee doing fieldwork will be furnished with rubber overshoes, as necessary.

      4. See Appendix B, Memorandum for Reimbursement Limits for Protective Footwear and Safety Glasses, and related resources.

    6. Hand Protection
      1. Hand protection will be worn to protect against specific hazards such as, but not limited to, chemical exposures, electrical hazards, heat, radiation, cuts, bruises, or abrasions.

      2. Glove selection for chemical protection will be based on performance characteristics of the gloves, the conditions in which they will be used, duration of use, and hazards present. See Appendix C Chemical Resistant Glove Selection.

      3. Based on a hazard assessment, the responsible OSHA Manager(s) will select and provide appropriate hand protection to employees who are potentially exposed.

    7. Protective Clothing and Equipment
      1. Size-appropriate protective clothing and equipment will be worn to protect against injury from flash fire hazards, water hazards, contact with hot or molten metal, radiation, chemical exposures, weather conditions, and hazards associated with low visibility (e.g., as road construction sites).

      2. The following personal protective clothing and equipment will be furnished or be made available to potentially exposed OSHA employees as needed:

        1. For general inclement weather hazards: (including heat and cold stress), waterproof/water resistant jacket and pants;

        2. For water hazards: U.S. Coast Guard-listed personal flotation devices (PFD’s);

        3. For road construction or any site where there is exposure to vehicular hazards: high visibility vests and amber safety lights;

        4. For the following industries, and those identified in a JHA: Appropriate FRC (i.e., such as face coverings, shirts, pants, jackets, coveralls, and coats) will be provided for the following sites, in addition to those identified in a JHA:

          1. Ferrous foundries;

          2. Non-ferrous foundries;

          3. Chemical plants and refineries.

          4. Oil and gas worksites, including upstream, mid-stream, and downstream operations.

          5. Combustible dust--containing facilities where dust samples may be collected, (i.e., grain handling facilities, wood working facilities, etc.). (See OSHA Technical Manual Section IV: Chapter 6 for Combustible Dust)

        5. For general purpose, dusty operations or site-specific operations, provide disposable personal protective equipment:

          1. Variety of sizes of full body overalls complete with head and foot covers will be made available;

          2. Disposable Level B suits (purchased on an as needed basis), as appropriate to the hazardous conditions, will be made available.

        6. Other specialized PPE will be provided on-an-as needed basis. Its use is discussed in specific SHMS Manual chapters: Chapter 16 – Hearing Conservation Program, Chapter 17 – Fall Protection, Chapter 18 - Respiratory Protection, Chapter 19 – Bloodborne Pathogens and Chapter 22 – Electrical Safety.

    8. Cleaning, Maintenance, and Disposal
      1. PPE will be inspected, cleaned, and maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations so that the PPE continues to provide the required protection. PPE will not be shared between employees until it has been properly cleaned and sanitized.

      2. PPE that cannot be decontaminated will be disposed of in compliance with applicable regulations (See SHMS Manual Chapter 26 - Decontamination).

    9. Training
      1. PPE training will include the following elements:

        1. When PPE is necessary;

        2. How to properly don, doff, and adjust PPE;

        3. Limitations of PPE;

        4. Care, maintenance, disposal, and useful life of PPE; and

        5. How PPE is important inside and outside of the workplace and necessary for all OSHA employees.

      2. After training, each responsible OSHA Manager(s) will ensure that each employee in their respective unit has an understanding of the proper use of PPE.

      3. Retraining is required when there are:

        1. Indications that PPE is not being used properly; or

        2. Changes in the PPE policy or equipment.

    10. Recordkeeping
      1. Written records will be kept of the names of persons trained, the type of training provided, and the dates when training occurred. (See Appendix D)

      2. All training records will be maintained at the office or OSHA organizational unit (e.g. CTC, SLTC and OTI) for at least five years. In the event that an employee transfers to another office, the employee will be provided with a copy of their training records.

      3. Certification of the PPE Inventory or Custody Receipt will be maintained at the local office or organizational unit. (See Appendix E)

      4. See SHMS Chapter 2 – Safety and Health Management System, for the required reoccurrence of training for this chapter.

APPENDIX A

This selection guide is based on ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020. It is not intended to be the sole reference in selecting the proper eye and face protector. A copy of this selection guide is also available for download from ISEA’s website.

This information is intended to aid in identifying and selecting the types of eye and face protectors that are available, and understanding their capabilities and limitations for the hazards listed. Care should be taken to recognize the possibility of multiple and simultaneous hazard exposures and the chosen protector(s) should be able to protect against the highest level of each hazard. Some protectors may not be compatible with other personal protective equipment when worn together. The end user needs to carefully match protectors with other personal protective equipment to provide the protection intended. Protectors are generally available in a variety of styles and sizes and care should be taken to ensure that the right size is selected for a particular person to ensure comfort and proper fit. Protectors that fit poorly will not afford the protection for which they were designed.

Below, there is mentioning of respirators that are being recommended only in conjunction with eye and face protectors. Employee should refer to the SHMS Chapter 18 - Respiratory Protection for more information, when respiratory protection selection is necessary.

Table A.1 Eye and face protection selection chart for impact activities including chipping, grinding, machining, masonry work, riveting, and sanding.
Hazard Protectors Limitations Marking1
Flying fragments, objects, large chips, particles, sand, dirt, etc.
  • Spectacles with side protection

  • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation

  • Face shield worn over spectacles or goggles

  • Welding helmet worn over spectacles or goggles

  • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

  • Full-facepiece respirator

Caution should be exercised in the use of metal frame protective devices in electrical hazard areas.

Metal frame protective devices could potentially cause electrical shock and electrical burn through contact with, or thermal burns from exposure to the hazards of electrical energy, which include radiation from accidental arcs.

To provide adequate protection, ensure goggles fit tightly to the face.

Atmospheric conditions and the restricted ventilation of a protector can cause lenses to fog. Frequent cleaning may be required.

Impact rated:
  • + (spectacle lens)

  • Z87+ (all other lens)

  • Z87+ (plano frame)

  • Z87-2+ (Rx frame)

Table A.2 Eye and face protection selection chart for heat exposure including furnace operations of pouring, casting, hot dipping, gas cutting, and welding.
Hazard Protectors Limitations Marking1
Hot sparks
  • Spectacles with side protection

  • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation

  • Face shield worn over spectacles or goggles

  • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles

  • Full-facepiece respirator

Spectacles, cup and cover type goggles do not provide unlimited facial protection.

Operations involving heat may also involve optical radiation. Protection from both hazards shall be provided.

NOTE:

There are currently no marking designations for eye protection to heat or high temperature exposure in the ANSI/ISEA

Splash from molten metal
    High temperature exposure
      Table A.3 Eye and face protection selection chart for chemical exposure including liquids, acid and chemical handling, degreasing, and plating
      Hazard Protectors Limitations Marking1
      Splash, droplets, and sprays
      • Goggles with indirect ventilation (eyecup or cover type)

      • Face shield worn over goggles)

      • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      Atmospheric conditions and the restricted ventilation of a protector can cause lenses to fog. Frequent cleaning may be required.

      To provide adequate protection, ensure goggles fit tightly to the face.

      Splash/droplet: D3
      Splash, droplets, and sprays
      • Goggle with no ventilation (cover type)

      • Face shield worn over goggles

      • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      Atmospheric conditions and the restricted ventilation of a protector can cause lenses to fog. Frequent cleaning may be required.

      To provide adequate protection, ensure goggles fit tightly to the face.

      NOTE: There are currently no marking designations for eye protection to Irritating mists exposure in the ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020 standard.
      Table A.4 Eye and face protection selection chart for dust hazards including woodworking, buffing and general dusty conditions
      Hazard Protectors Limitations Marking1
      Nuisance dust
      • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation (eyecup or cover type)

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      Atmospheric conditions and the restricted ventilation of a protector can cause lenses to fog. Frequent cleaning may be required.

      To provide adequate protection, ensure goggles fit tightly to the face.

      Dust: D4
      Fine dust
      • Goggles with indirect ventilation or no ventilation

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      To provide adequate protection, ensure goggles fit tightly to the face. Fine dust: D5
      Table A.5 Eye and face protection selection chart for optical radiation
      Hazard Protectors Limitations Marking1
      Infrared Radiation (IR)
      • Spectacles with side protection

      • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation

      • Face shield worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding helmet worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      For proper fit of protector there shall be no penetration of direct infrared spectra light in all non-lens areas.

      Side shields shall have filtering capability equal to or greater than the front lenses.

      IR: R scale number
      Visible Light (Glare)
      • Spectacles with side protection

      • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation

      • Face shield worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding helmet worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      For proper fit of protector; there shall be no penetration of direct visible light in all non-lens areas.

      Side shields shall have filtering capability equal to or greater than the front lenses.

      Visible: L and scale number
      Ultraviolet Radiation (UV)
      • Spectacles with side protection

      • Goggles with direct or indirect ventilation

      • Face shield worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding helmet worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Loose-fitting respirator worn over spectacles or goggles

      • Full-facepiece respirator

      For proper fit of protector; there shall be no penetration of direct ultraviolet light in all non-lens areas

      Side shields shall have filtering capability equal to or greater than the front lenses.

      UV: U and scale number
      Lasers Refer to ANSI Z136.1-2014 “Safe Use of Lasers”, for guidance in choosing the correct protective eyewear when working with lasers. - NOTE: The ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020 standard does not currently provide marking designations for eye protection to Lasers.
      Electric Arcs Refer to NFPA 70E-2018 “Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace”, for guidance in choosing the correct protective eyewear when working on electrical equipment. Only face shields provide compliant eye and face protection, worn overprotective spectacles. NOTE: The ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020 standard does not currently provide marking designations for eye protection to electrical arcs.

      Arc Welding: Arc

      Process Examples:

      • Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW)

      • Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)

      • Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)

      • Air Carbon Arc Welding (CAC-A)

      • Carbon Arc Welding (CAW)

      • Plasma Arc Welding (PAW)

      • Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC)

      • Viewing electric arc furnaces and boilers.

      • Welding helmet over spectacles or goggles

      • Hand shield over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding Respirator

      • TYPICAL FILTER LENS SHADE: 10-14

      Protection from optical radiation is directly related to filter lens density. Select the darkest shade that allows adequate task performance.

      For proper fit of protector; there shall be no penetration of direct visible light in all non-lens areas.

      Side shields shall have filtering capability equal to or greater than the front lenses.

      Welding helmets are intended to shield the eyes and face from optical radiation, heat, and impact.

      Welding helmets should not be used as stand-alone protective devices and should be worn in conjunction with goggles or spectacles.

      Filter lens shade selection is to be made based on the welding process, arc current, electrode size and/or plate thickness. Use ANSI Z49.1:2012, Table 1, Guide for Shade Numbers, to select the proper filter lens shade for both protection and comfort (reduction in visible glare).

      Note: Filter lenses shall meet the requirements for shade designations in table 7 of ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020.

      • Welding: W shade number
      • UV: U scale number
      • Visible: L scale number
      • IR: R scale number
      • Variable tint: V
      • Special purpose: S

      Oxyfuel Gas Welding:

      Process Examples:

      • Oxyfuel Gas Welding (OFW)

      • Viewing gas-fired furnaces and boilers

      • Welding goggles

      • Welding helmet over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding face shield over spectacles or goggles

      • TYPICAL FILTER LENS SHADE: 6 -8

      Protection from optical radiation is directly related to filter lens density. Select the darkest shade that allows adequate task performance.

      For proper fit of protector; there shall be no penetration of direct visible light in all non-lens areas.

      Side shields shall have filtering capability equal to or greater than the front lenses. Welding helmets are intended to shield the eyes and face from optical radiation, heat, and impact.

      Welding helmets should not be used as stand-alone protective devices and should be worn in conjunction with goggles or spectacles.

      Filter lens shade selection is to be made based on the welding process, arc current, electrode size and/or plate thickness. Use ANSI Z49.1:2012, Table 1, Guide for Shade Numbers, to select the proper filter lens shade for both protection and comfort (reduction in visible glare).

      Note: Filter lenses shall meet the requirements for shade designations in table 7 of ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020.

      • Welding: W shade number
      • UV: U scale number
      • Visible: L scale number
      • IR: R scale number
      • Variable tint: V
      • Special purpose: S
      Oxyfuel or Oxygen Cutting
      • Welding goggles

      • Welding helmet over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding face shield over spectacles or goggles

      • TYPICAL FILTER LENS SHADE: 3-6

      -
      Torch brazing
      • Welding goggles

      • Welding helmet over spectacles or goggles

      • Welding face shield over spectacles or goggles

      • TYPICAL FILTER LENS SHADE: 3-4

      -
      Torch soldering
      • Spectacles

      • Welding face shield over spectacles

      • TYPICAL FILTER LENS SHADE: 2

      Shade or special purpose lenses, as suitable.

      Note: Refer to definition of special purpose lenses in ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020.

      -
      Glare
      • Spectacles with or without side protection

      • Face shield over spectacles or goggles.

      -
      1. Refer to ANSI/ISEA Z87.1-2020 Table 3 for complete marking requirements.
      2. Refer to ANSI Z49.1: 2012: “Safety in Welding, Cutting, and Allied Processes”, Table 1, Guide for Shade Numbers, to select the proper lens filter protective shade based on welding process, arc current (in amperes), Electrode Size (arc welding only) and metal plate thickness (for oxyfuel and oxygen cutting only).
      3. Refer to ANSI Z136.1-2014 “Safe Use of Lasers”, for guidance on choosing the correct protective eyewear when working with lasers.
      APPENDIX B
      B.I. Memo: Reimbursement Limits for Protective Footwear and Safety Glasses

      The text of the memo on reimbursement limits for protective footwear and safety glasses is reproduced below and available for OSHA personnel on the OSHA intranet.

      DATE:
      August 15, 2012
      MEMORANDUM FOR:
      Regional Administrators
      National Office Directors
      FROM:
      Richard Fairfax
      Deputy Assistant Secretary
      SUBJECT:
      Reimbursement Limits for Protective Footwear and Safety Glasses

      As you are aware, there is a concern that the cost for prescription safety glasses has risen while the limits on reimbursement have remained static. This memorandum raises that limit to $350.00, and reiterates the frequency of reimbursement for such purposes. In addition to establishing the new rate on prescription safety glasses, we wish to clarify the policy that special protection foot and eyewear (i.e., anything other than ordinary steel-capped safety shoes and prescription safety glasses) will be purchased by the agency and issued to employees. There are no other changes to the policy. The authorized limits are reiterated below:

      Authorized Reimbursement Limits

      1. Employees whose regularly assigned duties and responsibilities require them to enter foot-hazardous areas are to be reimbursed for the purchase of regular steel-toed safety shoes. Safety shoes must comply with the requirements of the relevant ANSI standard, and may be purchased annually, with reimbursement not to exceed $120.00. Alternatively, and at the employee's option, such shoes may be purchased every other year, with reimbursement not to exceed $180.00.
      2. OSHA will be responsible for providing non-routine foot protection to employees whose work assignments require its use. This includes such items as high-topped safety boots; electrostatic-dissipative footwear; caulked logging boots ("corks"); footwear with metatarsal guards; etc. Such personal protective equipment (PPE) will be obtained through regular procurement channels and issued to employees as circumstances require. It is government property.
      3. Employees whose regularly assigned duties and responsibilities require them to enter eye-hazardous areas are to be reimbursed for the purchase of prescription safety glasses which comply with the requirements of the relevant ANSI standard. Prescription glasses may be purchased as often as medical prescriptions for corrective lenses change. Reimbursement is not regularly to
      4. exceed $350.00, except that supervisors are authorized to reimburse the actual cost of protective eyewear for employees with special vision needs. An example might be an employee with severe astigmatism who cannot buy corrective lenses within the regular $350.00 ceiling. Requests for reimbursement for actual costs must be supported by a signed statement from competent medical authority which attests to the special vision needs and to the fact that the required glasses cannot be purchased within the regular $350.00 limit. Supervisors are also authorized to approve reimbursement for the cost of replacing safety glasses accidentally broken during the course of duty.
      5. OSHA will be responsible for procuring and issuing non-prescription safety glasses/shields to employees with normal vision. It will also be responsible for providing nonroutine protective eyewear (such as face shields, UV protective goggles and welding shields, laser-protective eyewear, etc.) to employees whose work assignments require its use.

      Supervisors should be cautioned that the abuse of discretionary authority will result in it being withdrawn. Costs for these expenditures should continue to be charged against your organization's operation budget totals. No separate allocation will be made to cover the existing or increased costs of personal protective equipment associated with decision.

      Questions regarding these procedures should be addressed to Heather Lemay at lemay.heather@dol.gov.

      B.II Justification for PPE Purchase (Recommendation):

      U.S. Department of Labor

      STATEMENT OF JUSTIFICATION FOR:

      blank field SAFETY GLASSES

      blank field SAFETY SHOES

      In accordance with OSHA Administrative Directive PRO 02-00-001 – PRO 4.3, Procurement of Safety Glasses and Safety Shoes, justification is offered for blank field to acquire personal protective equipment for use in conducting OSHA inspection activity and work assignments. . These inspections are made in establishments where the occupational hazards are such that OSHA regulations require working personnel to wear personal protective equipment. Therefore, it is necessary that OSHA compliance personal also be afforded protection when exposed to similar working conditions.

      blank field INITIAL PURCHASE

      blank field ANNUAL REPLACEMENT

      DATE OF LAST PURCHASE: blank field

      REQUESTOR SIGNATURE: blank field

      blank field APPROVED

      blank field DISAPPROVED

      blank field
      Supervisor’s Signature

      blank field
      Area Director’s Signature

      Note: This statement of justification is to be returned to the requestor who will submit it, the receipt of purchase, the SF-1034, and the eye prescription (if prescription safety glasses) to the Administrative Officer for reimbursement.

      B.III Form SF 1034: Public Voucher for Purchases and Services Other Than Personnel
      Appendix C: Chemical Resistant Glove Selection
      Table: Chart of Gloves by Type, Advantages, Disadvantages, and Use
      Type Advantages Disadvantages Use Against
      Natural Rubber Low cost, good physical properties, dexterity Poor vs. oils, greases, organics; frequently imported, may be poor quality Bases, alcohols, dilute water solutions, fair vs. aldehydes, ketones
      Natural rubber blends Low cost, dexterity, better chemical resistance than natural rubber vs. some chemicals Physical properties frequently inferior to natural rubber Same as natural rubber
      Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) Low cost, very good physical properties, medium cost, medium chemical resistance Plasticizers can be stripped, frequently imported, may be poor quality Strong acids and bases, salts, other water solutions, alcohols
      Neoprene Medium cost, medium chemical resistance, medium physical properties N/A Oxidizing acids, anilines, phenol, glycol ethers, toluene
      Nitrile Low cost, excellent physical properties, dexterity Poor vs. benzene, methylene chloride, trechloroethylene, many ketones Oils, greases, aliphatic chemicals, xylene, perchloroethylene, trichloroethane; fair vs. toluene
      Butyl Specialty glove, polar organic Expensive, poor vs. hydrocarbons, chlorinated solvents Glycol ethers, ketones, esters
      Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) Specialty glove, organic solvents Very expensive, water sensitive , poor vs. light alcohols Aliphatics, aromatics, chlorinated solvents, ketones (except acetone), esters, ethers
      Fluoro-elastomer (Viton)* Organic solvent Poor physical properties, poor vs. some ketones, esters, amines Chlorinated solvents, also aliphatics and alcohols
      Norfiol (Silver Shield) Excellent chemical resistance Poor fit, easily punctures, poor grip, stiff Use for Hazmat work

      *Trademark of DuPont Dow elastomers

      Appendix D: Written records will be kept of the names of persons trained, the type of training provided, and the dates when training occurred.

      SHMS Training Topic:

      Presenter:

      Date:

      Appendix E: PPE Inventory/Custody Receipt

      OSHA Personnel PPE Inventory

      Date: blank field

      Office Name: blank field

      Certified by OSHA Manager: blank field

      Date: blank field

      Certified by Office PPE Coordinator: blank field

      Date: blank field

      This survey is for PPE assigned to you and in your possession. Take a few minutes to inspect the condition of your PPE. If any of your PPE needs to be replaced, please indicate this in the “need” column below and describe the condition.

      Complete and return to the OSHA Manager by (Date): blank field

      Staff Member Name: blank field

      If you think you or we need some other type of PPE that is not listed above, use the space below to describe:

       blank field