Direct-Reading Instruments

Standards

Direct-reading instruments are addressed in specific OSHA standards for general industry, maritime, and construction. This section highlights OSHA standards and documents related to direct-reading instruments.

OSHA Standards
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
Related Information

1910 Subpart H - Hazardous Materials

1910.120, Hazardous waste operations and emergency response. Direct-reading instruments are an important element of the monitoring program outlined by this standard. [related topic page]

Related Information

1910 Subpart J - General Environmental Controls

1910.146, Permit-required confined spaces. Confined spaces must be tested before entry with a direct-reading instrument for oxygen content, flammable gases and vapors, and toxic contaminants. [related topic page]

Related Information

1910 Subpart R - Special Industries

1910.269, Electric Power Generation, Transmission, and Distribution. Direct-reading instruments are required to test for oxygen-deficient atmospheres and flammable gases and vapors. [related topic page]

Related Information

1910.272, Grain handling facilities. See Appendix A for information related to grain handling facilities.

Related Information
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Related Information

1915 Subpart B - Confined and Enclosed Spaces and Other Dangerous Atmospheres in Shipyard Employment

1915.12, Precautions and the order of testing before entering confined and enclosed spaces and other dangerous atmospheres. Includes similar requirements to 29 CFR 1910.146.

Related Information
Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)
Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)
Related Information

1926 Subpart D

1926.65, Hazardous waste operations and emergency response. Contains requirements identical to 29 CFR 1910.120 regarding direct-reading instruments used in construction.

Related Information
State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

Additional Letters of Interpretation

Note: The letters in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.

Other Resources