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Young Worker Safety in Restaurants
Cooling Vent - Heat Hazards Emergency Extinguisher - Fire Hazards
Circuit Breakers - Electrical Hazards
Oven - Burns
Cooks - Burns
Cook - Strains and Sprains
Wood-heated Oven - Burns
Deep Fat Fryer
Floor Mats - Slips/Trips/Falls
Open Stove - Burns
Fire Extinguisher - Fire Hazards
Cooking

The Cooking area of a restaurant offers young workers an opportunity for developing cooking skills, while learning to handle equipment and organize tasks. Young workers in this area may also be exposed to the following hazards:

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Safety Poster
 
Electrical Hazards
Potential Hazard

There are many electrical hazards in commercial restaurant kitchens because of the variety of electrical appliances in use. Young workers may be exposed to electrocution, shock, or death from unsafe work practices, faulty electrical equipment or wiring, or use of damaged receptacles and connectors.

Possible Solutions

Young Worker Solutions
Employers have the primary responsibility for protecting the safety and health of their workers. Employees are responsible for following the safe work practices of their employers.
Receptacle type (GFCI)
Receptacle type (GFCI)
  • Workers should know:

    • Emergency procedures and policies for their workplace.

    • How to shut off the current in case of an emergency.

    • How to perform CPR.

    • To pull the plug, not the cord when unplugging equipment.

    • To keep power cords clear of equipment during use.

    • To use ceiling plugs rather than draping cords across aisles.

    • Not to touch a worker being shocked until the power has been turned off.

    • Not to use faulty equipment or damaged receptacles and connectors.

    • Not to plug in electrical equipment while touching a wet or damp surface.

    • Not to use cords that are worn or damaged or cords that feel warm during use; they have the potential to start a fire. Use a higher capacity cord or a multi-outlet power strip unit with a built-in circuit breaker instead of an extension cord. Do not use equipment cords that feel warm during use have them checked by an electrician.

    • To report unsafe equipment and work practices to your employer immediately.

Employer Solutions
Employers have the primary responsibility for protecting the safety and health of their workers. Employees are responsible for following the safe work practices of their employers.
Grounded cord
Grounded cord

Damaged cord
Damaged cord

Follow OSHA Standards including:

Consider implementing recommended safe work practices, including:

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommendations:

  • Use ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) in situations where electricity and wetness coexist. GFCIs will interrupt the electrical circuit before current sufficient to cause death or serious injury has passed through a body.

  • Exposed receptacle boxes be made of nonconductive material so that contact with the box will not constitute a "ground."

  • Plugs and receptacles be designed to prevent energization until insertion is complete.

Additional Resources


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