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Hazard Assessment and Job Briefing
Job Briefings and Best Practices Job briefing

The "269" standard requires that before each job, the person in charge conducts a job briefing with all workers that covers, at a minimum:
  • Hazards associated with the work
  • Procedures to be used
  • Any special precautions
  • Control of energy sources
  • Personal protective equipment (PPE) required
Person in charge. The "person in charge" can be anyone in authority. When work is assigned at the beginning of a shift, the person in charge typically is a supervisor or foreperson. If the briefing takes place upon arrival at a work site, it could be the lead person on the crew. If workers arrive at a substation to perform work, it could be the operator in charge of that substation.
1910.269 Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory See: 1910.269(c) on job briefing requirements

Number of briefings
. The "269" standard requires that at least one briefing be held at the start of each shift. However, if there is a significant change during the course of a shift, for example, if a new hazard is discovered or an assignment changes, then additional briefings must be conducted before the work continues.

Extent of briefings. A brief discussion is acceptable if workers are experienced and the work is routine. However, a more extensive job briefing is needed if the job is more complex or especially hazardous, if the work is not something done on a regular basis, or if the workers are not familiar with each other.
1910.269 Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory See: 1910.269(c), (m), (o), and (u) on employee or operator "in charge"



Working alone
. Many workers in the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry work alone, making it difficult to discuss topics that need to be covered in a job briefing. People who work alone need to assess and plan each job before they begin work and identify any potential hazards and how they will be addressed.


Proposed rule: 1910.269

OSHA has proposed changing the job briefing requirements. See the proposed rule for additional information.
Checklists. Keeping a written record of job briefings is not specifically covered by the standard, but it is a best practice to do so. A written checklist can include the hazards, procedures, precautions, and PPE requirements associated with a job, as well as a column for employee signatures indicating they are knowledgeable about job hazards and safety procedures. Such documentation can help ensure that proper briefings are held at the right times (for example, beginning of a shift) and that everyone has been informed. For an example checklist, see the "Job Briefing and Planning Checklist" in Annex I of the National Fire Protection Association's NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, 2004 Edition.

Hazard Assessments and Job Briefings


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