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Computer Workstations


Red ring marks top of monitor Red rings mark neck and shoulder Top of monitor at or just below eye level
Head and neck balanced and in-line with torso
Shoulders relaxed
Red ring marks fingers on keyboard
Computer desk Red ring marks wrist, elbow and armrest
Elbows close to body and supported
Lower back supported
Chair controls
Wrist and hands in-line with forearms
Computer tower Red ring marks feet Chair with five-leg base
Adequate room for keyboard and mouse
Feet flat on the floor
Millions of people work with computers every day. This eTool* illustrates simple, inexpensive principles that will help you create a safe and comfortable computer workstation. There is no single “correct” posture or arrangement of components that will fit everyone. However, there are basic design goals, some of which are shown in the accompanying figure, to consider when setting up a computer workstation or performing computer-related tasks.

Consider your workstation as you read through each section and see if you can identify areas for improvement in posture, component placement, or work environment. This eTool provides suggestions to minimize or eliminate identified problems, and allows you to create your own "custom-fit" computer workstation.

Use a Checklist!
Knowledge is the KeyUse the evaluation checklist to analyze existing workstations. Use the purchasing guide checklist to evaluate new purchases.
Quick Tips
Look for quick tip boxes to provide basic solutions for common hazards. A more in-depth look at computer workstation hazards and solutions can be found further down the page of each section.

How do I find out about employer responsibilities and worker rights?

Workers have a right to a safe workplace. The law requires employers to provide their employees with working conditions that are free of known dangers. The OSHA law also prohibits employers from retaliating against employees for exercising their rights under the law (including the right to raise a health and safety concern or report an injury). For more information see www.whistleblowers.gov or worker rights.

OSHA has a great deal of information to assist employers in complying with their responsibilities under the OSHA law.

OSHA can help answer questions or concerns from employers and workers. To reach your regional or area OSHA office, go to OSHA's Regional & Area Offices webpage or call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742).

Small business employers may contact OSHA's free and confidential on-site consultation service to help determine whether there are hazards at their worksites and work with OSHA on correcting any identified hazards. On-site consultation services are separate from enforcement activities and do not result in penalties or citations. To contact OSHA's free consultation service, go to OSHA's On-site Consultation webpage or call 1-800-321-OSHA (6742) and press number 4.

Workers may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that their employer is not following OSHA standards or that there are serious hazards. Employees can file a complaint with OSHA by calling 1-800-321-OSHA (6742), online via eCompliant Form, or by printing the complaint form and mailing or faxing it to your local OSHA area office. Complaints that are signed by an employee are more likely to result in an inspection.

If you think your job is unsafe or you have questions, contact OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742). It's confidential. We can help. For other valuable worker protection information, such as Workers' Rights, Employer Responsibilities, and other services OSHA offers, visit OSHA's Workers' page.


*eTools are web-based products that provide guidance information for developing a comprehensive safety and health program. They include recommendations for good industry practice that often go beyond specific OSHA mandates. As indicated in the disclaimer, eTools do not create new OSHA requirements.


eTools Home :Computer Workstation References | Credits