Respiratory Protection

Standards

Respiratory protection is addressed in specific OSHA standards for general industry, maritime, and construction.  This section highlights OSHA standards and documents related to respiratory protection.

OSHA's revised Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134 and 29 CFR 1926.103) went into effect April 8, 1998. The final standard replaces the respiratory protection standards adopted by OSHA in 1971. The 29 CFR 1910.139 respirator standard that applied only to respiratory protection against Mycobacterium Tuberculosis was withdrawn December 31, 2003. Establishments whose respiratory protection programs for tuberculosis formerly covered under 29 CFR 1910.139 were required to adapt their programs to comply with the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.134 effective July 2, 2004.

OSHA Standards
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
Related Information

1910 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1910.134, Respiratory Protection.

Related Information
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Related Information

1915 Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment

1915.154, Respiratory protection.

Related Information

1917 Subpart E

1917.92, Respiratory protection.

Related Information

1918 Subpart J - Personal Protective Equipment

1918.102, Respiratory protection.

Related Information
Construction (29 CFR 1926)
Construction (29 CFR 1926)
Related Information

1926 Subpart E - Personal Protective and Life Saving Equipment

1926.103, Respiratory protection.

Related Information
State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

Other Preambles to Final Rules

Preambles to final rules explain the provisions of the final standard, describe changes that were made, discuss the Agency’s response to comments received from stakeholders, and present the rationale cited for making the changes found in the final standard, along with the cost/benefit and economic analysis supporting the final standard.

Additional Federal Register notices

Note: The notices in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.