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Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool
Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool
Powered Industrial Trucks (Forklift) eTool
 Types & Fundamentals

   Parts

     Mast and Carriage
     Forks
     Attachments
     Nameplate
     Danger, Warning &
        Caution Labels

     Controls
     Instruments
     Battery
     Overhead Guard
     Tires
     Safety Devices

Parts:
Nameplate
This data label indicates that this forklift has a 156" upright mast height in column A and a 24" load center in column B. Its stated capacity is 5,000 lbs with just its forks. With the sideshifter attachment, its stated capacity is 4,500 pounds. The truck weighs 8,600 pounds.
Figure 1. This data label indicates that this forklift has a 156" upright mast height in column A and a 24" load center in column B. Its stated capacity is 5,000 lbs with just its forks. With the sideshifter attachment, its stated capacity is 4,500 pounds. The truck weighs 8,600 pounds.
Each operator is required to be aware of the truck specifications on the nameplate and what they mean. If there is a special attachment, it must be listed on the nameplate.

Nameplate
The nameplate (also called the data plate) provides important information for the forklift operator, including the fuel type, forklift weight, and capacity. Operators should read the nameplate to know the forklifts capabilities and limitations.

Requirements and Recommended Practices:

OSHA requirements state:

"Approved trucks shall bear a label or some other identifying mark indicating approval by the testing laboratory. See paragraph (a)(7) of this section and paragraph 405 of "American National Standard for Powered Industrial Trucks, Part II, ANSI B56.1-1969", which is incorporated by reference in paragraph (a)(2) of this section and which provides that if the powered industrial truck is accepted by a nationally recognized testing laboratory, it should be so marked." [29 CFR 1910.178(a)(3)]
  • Train employees to properly read and understand the nameplate and to know what the information means.

  • Ensure every truck has its durable, corrosion-resistant nameplate legibly inscribed with the following information:

    • Truck model and serial number

    • Truck weight

    • Designation of compliance with the mandatory requirements of ASME B56.1, "Safety Standard for Low and High Lift Trucks," applicable to the manufacturer

    • Type designation to show conformance with the requirements, such as those prescribed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., and Factory Mutual Research Corporation

    • Capacity
  • Do not operate a truck with an illegible or missing nameplate.
Additional Information:

ANSI/ITSDF B56.1 calls for additional information on nameplates on high-lift trucks, electric trucks, and trucks intended for use in hazardous locations. [See ANSI/ITSDF B56.1, "Safety Standard for Low and High Lift Trucks," Section 7.5, "Nameplates and Markings"]


Capacity
The nameplate indicates that the  capacity of the truck is 4,500 pounds with the sideshifter attachment.
Figure 2. The nameplate indicates that the  capacity of the truck is 4,500 pounds with the sideshifter attachment.
The capacity is the manufacturers guideline for how much weight a forklift can safety lift. Exceeding the capacity of a forklift presents serious hazards, including tipover.

The nameplate in Figure 2 indicates that the forklift is an LPS type, which is a liquid petroleum gas powered unit provided with additional safeguards to operate in certain hazardous locations. The truck weight is 8,680 pounds and its capacity is 5,000 pounds at a 24 inch load center to a maximum height of 130 inches. The nameplate indicates that the capacity of the forklift with the sideshifter attachment is 4,500 pounds to a maximum height of 156 inches.

If the load has a different load center or it is irregular, such as a series of boxes of varying weights, then the capacity must be recalculated. [See Load Composition].


Requirements and Recommended Practices:
  • Train employees to properly read the nameplate and to understand what the information means.

  • Check the nameplate for maximum capacity and maximum height.

  • Do not exceed the capacity of the truck.

  • Understand that the addition of an attachment generally lowers the capacity of a forklift.
     
  • Understand that the size, position and weight distribution of the load also affects the capacity. Capacity assumes the center of gravity of the load is at the load center shown on the label. If this is not the case, the load may exceed the forklift's capacity.

Types & Fundamentals | Operating the Forklift | Understanding the Workplace | Training Assistance
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