Scaffolding

Standards

Scaffolding is addressed in specific OSHA standards for general industry, maritime, and construction. This section highlights OSHA standards and documents related to scaffolding.

OSHA Standards
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
General Industry (29 CFR 1910)
Related Information

1910 Subpart B - Adoption and Extension of Established Federal Standards

1910.16, Longshoring and marine terminals.

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1910 Subpart D - Walking-Working Surfaces

1910.23, Ladders. See Figure D-1 for information related to ladders are not placed on boxes, barrels, or other unstable bases to obtain additional height.

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1910.27, Scaffolds and rope descent systems.

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1910 Subpart Q - Welding, Cutting and Brazing

1910.252, General requirements. See paragraph (b)(1)(i) for information related to railing.

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1910 Subpart R - Special Industries

1910.272, Grain handling facilities. See Appendix A for information related to grain handling facilities.

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Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
Maritime (29 CFR 1915, 1917, 1918)
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1915 Subpart E

1915.71, Scaffolds or staging.

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1915.77, Working surfaces. See paragraph (c) for information related to employees are working aloft.

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1915 Subpart G - Gear and Equipment for Rigging and Materials Handling

1915.114, Chain falls and pull-lifts. See paragraph (d) for information related to scaffolding.

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1915 Subpart P

1915.509, Definitions applicable to this subpart.

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1917 Subpart A - Scope and Definitions

1917.1, Scope and applicability.

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1917 Subpart F - Terminal Facilities

1917.119, Portable ladders. See paragraph (f)(2) for information related to ladders. See paragraph (f)(2)(i) for information related to as guys, braces or skids; or.

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1918 Subpart C - Gangways and Other Means of Access

1918.24, Fixed and portable ladders.

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State Standards

There are 28 OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

Preambles to Final Rules
Additional Directives

Note: The directives in this list provide additional information that is not necessarily connected to a specific OSHA standard highlighted on this Safety and Health Topics page.