Alert: Due to routine maintenance on the OSHA website, some pages may be temporarily unavailable.
To report an emergency, file a complaint with OSHA or ask a safety and health question, call 1-800-321-6742 (OSHA).

Mercury

Possible Solutions

Controlling mercury exposure is best accomplished through substituting it with a non-toxic chemical, depending on the application. If this cannot be done, engineering, administrative, and personal protective equipment (PPE) should be used.

  • Breeding, D. "Safe Use and Handling of Mercury." Occupational Health Safety 70.10(2001): 72-74, 76, 92-93.
  • MacLehose, R., et al. "Mercury Contamination Incident." J. Public Health Med. 23.1(2001): 18-22.
  • International Chemical Safety Cards (ICSC). National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Summarizes essential health and safety information.
  • Mercury, Elemental and Inorganic Compounds. New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services (NJDHSS) Right to Know Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet, (November 2009). Contains hazard summary information, control strategies, and common questions and answers. Also available:
  • Protect Your Family: Reduce Contamination at Home. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 97-125. Provides information, for people who work with mercury and other harmful substances, on how to reduce the transfer of contaminants from work to their homes.
  • NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication 2005-149, (September 2007). Contains exposure limits, physical description, and personal protective equipment options for various mercury air concentrations.