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OSHA Standards

A variety of companies are researching and developing nanotechnology. Although there are nanomaterials in a few products used in the construction industry, most of these activities fall under OSHA General Industry standards. This page highlights some of the applicable General Industry OSHA standards.

Standards

Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 654), often referred to as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to "furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to cause death or serious physical harm to his employees." Section 5(a)(2) requires employers to "comply with occupational safety and health standards" promulgated under this Act.

State Standards

Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these states adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some states have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

Note: Twenty-four states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

Applicable Standards

The following are examples of standards that may be applicable in situations where employees are exposed to nanomaterials.

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