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Hazards for Other Workers

The industries with the highest number of electrocutions were construction, followed by manufacturing, transportation, communications, and public utilities. Although the workers in these industries are not employees of the electric power generation, transmission, and distribution industry, they often work near energized power lines. This subjects them to the risk of electrocution when:

  • A boomed vehicle, truck, or other vehicle comes into contact with electric power distribution or transmission lines,
  • A ladder or scaffold comes into contact with electric power distribution or transmission lines,
  • A backhoe or other digging device comes into contact with underground electric power distribution or transmission lines, or
  • A worker makes bodily contact with electric power distribution or transmission lines.
Cable Installers
  • See OSHA's Electric Power Generation, Distribution, and Transmission Industry - Construction Page.
Construction Workers
  • See OSHA's Electric Power Generation, Distribution, and Transmission Industry - Construction Page.
Tree Trimmers
Truck Drivers
Other
Safety References

Workers who will be performing work within the minimum approach distances of power lines established in [29 CFR 1910.269(r)(1)(iii)], training them solely in the use of personal protective equipment such as rubber gloves and sleeves alone will not satisfy the training requirements of 29 CFR 1910.269. The employees must be either (1) trained as qualified employees, or (2) must be undergoing on-the-job training, have demonstrated an ability to perform duties safely at their level of training, and be under the direct supervision of a qualified employee.

Apparel

  • Guidelines for the Enforcement of the Apparel Standard, 29 CFR 1910.269(l)(6). OSHA Standard Interpretation, (1995, August 10). When work is performed within reaching distance of exposed energized parts of equipment, the employee should remove all exposed conductive articles, such as key or watch chains, rings, or wrist watches or bands. Clothing made from acetate, nylon, polyester, or rayon, either alone or in blends, is prohibited unless the employer can demonstrate that the fabric has been treated to withstand the conditions that may be encountered.

Fall Protection

Minimum Approach Distance

  • Clarification of 1910.269 as applied to line-clearance tree-trimming operations. OSHA Standard Interpretation, (1999, April 26). Provides a clarification of line-clearance tree-trimming work. The employees must be either (1) trained as qualified employees, or (2) must be "undergoing on-the-job training," have "demonstrated an ability to perform duties safely at [their] level of training," and be "under the direct supervision of a qualified [employee]."
  • Permit space entry. OSHA Standard Interpretation, (1994, August 8). Provides a response to a question about what confined space entry requirements apply to subcontractors who perform work (not involving power generation, transmission, or distribution) in utility company manholes and vaults.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Report

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