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Publications:

A Guide for Protecting Workers from Woodworking Hazards [540 KB PDF*, 74 pages]. OSHA Publication 3157, (1999).

References:

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). 1996. Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents - Biological Exposure Indices. 6th ed.

ACGIH. Industrial Ventilation: a Manual of Recommended Practice. ACGIH Committee on Industrial Ventilation.

Bureau of Labor Statistics. 1995. Fatal Work-place Injuries in 1993: A Collection of Data and Analysis. U.S. Department of Labor.

Hampl, V. 1982. Development of Criteria for Control of Woodworking Operation. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. July.

Firenze, R. J., and J. B. Walters. 1981. Safety and Health for Industrial/Vocational Education. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. July.

Massachusetts Department of Public Health. 1997. Woodworker dies when struck by tool knife launched from over arm router. Occupational Health Surveillance Program. Fatality investigation report 2:2. February.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). 1997. Questions and Answers: Methylene Chloride Control in Furniture Stripping (NIOSH Publication No. 93-133). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

NIOSH. 1975a. Health and Safety Guide for Wooden Furniture Manufacturing (NIOSH Publication No. 75-167). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

NIOSH. 1975b. Machine guarding - Assessment of need. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. June.

National Safety Council. 1988. Accident Prevention Manual for Industrial Operations: Engineering and Technology. 9th Ed. Itasca, IL: National Safety Council.

National Safety Council. 1993. Safeguarding Concepts Illustrated. 6th ed.

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). 1997. Assessing the Need for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE): a Guide for Small Business Employers (OSHA Publication No. 3151). U.S. Department of Labor.

OSHA. 1992. Concepts and Techniques of Machine Safeguarding (OSHA Publication No. 3067). U.S. Department of Labor. See Index on OSHA's Website.

OSHA Standards:

Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)
Part 1910

Subpart D - Walking and Working Surfaces

Subpart E - Means of Egress

Subpart G - Occupational Health and Environmental Control
1910.95 - Noise control

Subpart H - Hazardous Materials
1910.107 - Spray finishing using flammable and combustible materials
1910.122 - Table of contents
1910.123 - Dipping and coating operations: Coverage and definitions
1910.124 - General requirements for dipping and coating operations
1910.125 - Additional requirements for dipping and coating operations that use flammable or combustible liquids
1910.126 - Additional requirements for special dipping and coating operations

Subpart I - Personal Protective Equipment (Covers eye and face, head, foot, hand, and respiratory protection)

Subpart J - General Environmental Controls
1910.147 - Control of hazardous energy ("Lock-out Tagout")

Subpart L - Fire Protection

Subpart N - Materials Handling and Storage
1910.178 - Powered industrial trucks

Subpart O - Machinery and Machine Guarding
1910.212 - General requirements for all machines
1910.213 - Woodworking machinery requirements
1910.219 - Mechanical power transmission apparatus

Subpart S - Electrical

Subpart Z - Toxic and Hazardous Substances
1910.1200 - Hazard communication

Other Standards:

National Fire Protection Association:

NFPA 10 Installation of Portable Fire Extinguishers

NFPA 33 Standard for Spray Finishing Using Flammable and Combustible Materials

NFPA 70 National Electrical Code

NFPA 644-1993 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Explosions in Wood Processing and Woodworking Facilities

American National Standards Institute:

ANSI Z9.2 Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems

ANSI O1.1-1992 Woodworking Machinery - Safety Requirements

NIOSH Hazard Controls:

The National Institute for Occupational safety and Health (NIOSH) has published a series of seven Hazard Controls fact sheets concerning wood dust control techniques. NIOSH is the federal agency responsible for conducting research and making recommendations for preventing work-related illness and injuries. Hazard Controls are based on research studies that show reduced worker exposure to hazardous agents or activities. Copies of the Hazard Controls fact sheets and additional information about hazard control can be obtained by calling NIOSH at 1-800-35-NIOSH or visiting NIOSH's website at Publications and Products. The following is a list of NIOSH's Hazard Controls:

Control Of Wood Dust From Horizontal Belt Sanders - HC-4. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-126, (1996, September).

Control Of Wood Dust From Shapers - HC-5. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-122, (1996, September).

Control Of Wood Dust From Automated Routers - HC-6. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-123, (1996, September).

Control Of Wood Dust From Large Diameter Disc Sanders - HC-7. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-124, (1996, September).

Control Of Wood Dust From Random Orbital Hand Sanders - HC-8. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-125, (1996, September).

Control Of Wood Dust Orbital Hand Sanders - HC-9. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-121, (1996, September).

Guidance For Controlling Potential Risks To Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 2002-149, (2002, July). This guidance is intended only for controlling health risks to workers from Class B biosolids during handling and land application. This guidance is not intended to address nonoccupational exposure. Note: This publication supercedes Control Of Wood Dust From Table Saws - HC-10.


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