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Occupational Hazards in Long Term Care   
Nursing Home eTool

Today nursing homes and residential care facilities employ approximately 2.8 million workers at 21,000 work sites. Many nursing home tasks require considerable lifting and other strenuous physical labor.  Historically the injury rate for workers in these facilities is double the injury rate for all full time workers in other occupations.  This eTool* is designed to assist employers and employees in identifying and controlling the hazards associated with nursing homes and residential care facilities. 


Hazards found in a Nursing Home Ergonomics Module Workplace Violence Module Tuberculosis Module Pharmacy Module Dietary Module Utility Module LaundryModule Whirlpool/Shower Module Bloodborne Pathogens Module Maintenance Module Nurses Station Module

This eTool addresses the following topics:

Workers' Rights

Workers have the right to:

  • Working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.
  • Receive information and training (in a language and vocabulary the worker understands) about workplace hazards, methods to prevent them, and the OSHA standards that apply to their workplace.
  • Review records of work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • File a complaint asking OSHA to inspect their workplace if they believe there is a serious hazard or that their employer is not following OSHA's rules. OSHA will keep all identities confidential.
  • Exercise their rights under the law without retaliation, including reporting an injury or raising health and safety concerns with their employer or OSHA. If a worker has been retaliated against for using their rights, they must file a complaint with OSHA as soon as possible, but no later than 30 days.

For additional information, see OSHA's Workers page.

How to Contact OSHA

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov or call OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742), TTY 1-877-889-5627.

*eTools are "stand-alone," illustrated, Web-based training tools on occupational safety and health topics. As indicated in the disclaimer, eTools do not create new OSHA requirements.

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