Powered by GoogleTranslate

Chromium

Chromium - Photo Credit: iStock-172746772 | Copyright: davidf
Chromium Menu

Overview

Highlights

Primary Uses for Chromium

  • Stainless steel
  • Heat-resistant alloys
  • Nonferrous alloys
  • Plating
  • Catalysts
  • Leather Processing
  • Paints and Coatings
  • Refractories
  • Pigments

Emerging Use for Chromium

  • Iron-Chromium flow batteries used for energy storage in renewable energy generation
  • Superalloys

Chromium is a steel gray, lustrous, hard metal extracted from chromite ores. In 2011, U.S. production of chromium was estimated at 160,000 metric tons, coming almost entirely from recycling stainless steel scraps. In addition, the U.S. imported 430,000 metric tons of chromium, primarily from South Africa, Kazakhstan, Russia and China. Chromium is valued for its high corrosion resistance and hardness. It is most often used as an alloy (ferrochrome) in stainless steel and in chrome plating. In addition, chromium is used in the pigment and dye, tanning, and glassmaking industries, in reflective paints, for wood preservation, to anodize aluminum, to produce synthetic rubies, as a catalyst in chemical manufacturing and as an isotope in medicine. Elemental chromium is seldom found naturally in the environment. The oxidized states of chromium III and chromium VI are the most important forms of the chemical. Chromium III is an essential trace element in humans but chronic exposure may be harmful. Chromium VI (hexavalent chromium) is the oxidized state of principal concern in occupational safety and health and the environment because of its extreme toxicity and designation as a human carcinogen. OSHA's hexavalent chromium safety and health topics page provides comprehensive information on health effects, exposure controls, OSHA standards, and additional resources on this toxic substance.

Who is exposed to the common forms of chromium?

Occupational exposures to chromium occur primarily in the metal and chemical manufacturing industries, although exposures are also possible in other industries where chromium compounds are used.

Occupational exposure to chromium can occur in the following industries and operations:

  • Stainless steel welding [Cr(VI)]
  • Chromate production [Cr(VI)]
  • Chrome plating [Cr(VI)]
  • Ferrochrome industry [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Chrome pigments [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Leather tanning [mostly Cr(III)]

Occupations that may involve chromium exposures include:

  • Painters [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Abrasive blasting workers [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Workers involved in the maintenance and servicing of copying machines and the disposal of some toner powders from copying machines [Cr(VI)]
  • Battery makers [Cr(VI)]
  • Candle makers [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Dye makers [Cr(III)]
  • Printers [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Rubber makers [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Cement workers [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]
  • Workers involved in welding, cutting, brazing, soldering, torch and other hot work operations. [Cr(III) and Cr(VI)]

OSHA sets enforceable permissible exposure limits (PELs) to protect workers from the health effects of exposure to chromium metal and various chromium compounds under 1910.1000 Table Z-1 Limits for Air Contaminants. The most toxic form of chromium is hexavalent chromium. OSHA requirements for protecting workers from hexavalent chromium exposure are found in specific OSHA standards covering general industry (Chromium (VI) - 1910.1026), shipyards (Chromium (VI) - 1915.1026), and construction (Chromium (VI) - 1926.1126).

Additional Resources for Chromium
Workers' Rights

Workers have the right to:

  • Working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.
  • Receive information and training (in a language and vocabulary the worker understands) about workplace hazards, methods to prevent them, and the OSHA standards that apply to their workplace.
  • Review records of work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • File a complaint asking OSHA to inspect their workplace if they believe there is a serious hazard or that their employer is not following OSHA's rules. OSHA will keep all identities confidential.
  • Exercise their rights under the law without retaliation, including reporting an injury or raising health and safety concerns with their employer or OSHA. If a worker has been retaliated against for using their rights, they must file a complaint with OSHA as soon as possible, but no later than 30 days.

For additional information, see OSHA's Workers page.

How to Contact OSHA

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov or call OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742), TTY 1-877-889-5627.

Highlights

Primary Uses for Chromium

  • Stainless steel
  • Heat-resistant alloys
  • Nonferrous alloys
  • Plating
  • Catalysts
  • Leather Processing
  • Paints and Coatings
  • Refractories
  • Pigments

Emerging Use for Chromium

  • Iron-Chromium flow batteries used for energy storage in renewable energy generation
  • Superalloys
Back to Top

Thank You for Visiting Our Website

You are exiting the Department of Labor's Web server.

The Department of Labor does not endorse, takes no responsibility for, and exercises no control over the linked organization or its views, or contents, nor does it vouch for the accuracy or accessibility of the information contained on the destination server. The Department of Labor also cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked Web sites. Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked Web site. Thank you for visiting our site. Please click the button below to continue.

Close