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Safety and Health Topics

OSHA's Safety and Health Topics web pages provide information on specific safety and health hazards, as well as specific hazard information on different industries. These pages provide information on hazard identification and control, as well as existing OSHA standards where applicable. This information can be helpful to employers in complying with OSHA standards.
To find a specific Safety and Health Topics web page, search the Safety and Health Topics Pages Alphabetical Listing. If you cannot find what you are looking for, you may also search the main OSHA A-Z Index. Are you interested in web-based training tools on occupational safety and health topics? Try OSHA's eTools, eMatrix, Expert Advisors and v-Tools! For other training material, visit OSHA's Training web page. If you are an employer or a small business, visit OSHA's web pages for employers and free services to small businesses. For other General Safety and Health Information, visit the General Safety and Health References page.

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Safety and Health Topics Pages

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OSHA QuickTakes

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Featured Topics Previously Featured Topics

Proposed Rulemaking for Occupational Exposure to Beryllium
Proposed Rulemaking for Occupational Exposure to Beryllium

Workers who inhale airborne beryllium in the workplace can develop a lung condition called chronic beryllium disease or CBD. Occupational exposure to beryllium has also been linked to lung cancer. Beryllium is classified as a human carcinogen by the US Department of Health and Human Services National Toxicology Program and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. OSHA recently released a proposed rule to protect workers exposed to beryllium. This is a proposal, not a final rule. OSHA encourages the public to participate in the development of the rule by submitting comments and participating in a public hearing if one takes place. Your input will help OSHA develop an effective health standard that protects employees from beryllium-related health effects to the extent feasible for employers.

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OSHA's Campaign to Prevent Heat Illness in Outdoor Workers
OSHA's Campaign to Prevent Heat Illness in Outdoor Workers

OSHA's nationwide Heat Illness Prevention Campaign aims to raise awareness and teach workers and employers about the dangers of working in hot weather and provide valuable resources to address these concerns. Begun in 2011, the Heat Illness Prevention Campaign has reached more than 10.7 million people and distributed close to half a million fact sheets, posters, quick cards, training guides and wallet cards. OSHA is again joining with other federal and state agencies and non-governmental organizations to spread the word about preventing heat illness.

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Confined Spaces Final Rule
Confined Spaces Final Rule

"This rule will save lives of construction workers. Unlike most general industry worksites, construction sites are continually evolving, with the number and characteristics of confined spaces changing as work progresses. This rule emphasizes training, continuous worksite evaluation and communication requirements to further protect workers’ safety and health."

— Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, Dr. David Michaels

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Updates to Recordkeeping Rule
Updates to Recordkeeping Rule

"OSHA will now receive crucial reports of fatalities and severe work-related injuries and illnesses that will significantly enhance the agency’s ability to target our resources to save lives and prevent further injury and illness. This new data will enable the agency to identify the workplaces where workers are at the greatest risk and target our compliance assistance and enforcement resources accordingly."

— Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health, Dr. David Michaels

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Health Hazards in Nail Salons
Health Hazards in Nail Salons

Nail salons are mostly small businesses that employ or contract with trained professionals to provide clients with nail services including, but not limited to, nail filing and polishing, artificial nail application, and other hand- and foot-care treatments. The more than 375,000 nail technicians working in salons across the United States face possible health hazards every day. The hazards include exposure to chemicals from glues, polishes, removers, and other salon products; muscle strains from awkward positions or repetitive motions; and risk of infection from contact with client skin, nails, or blood.

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Worker Safety in Hospitals
Hospital Safety

Did you know that a hospital is one of the most hazardous places to work? In 2011, U.S. hospitals recorded 253,700 work-related injuries and illnesses, a rate of 6.8 work-related injuries and illnesses for every 100 full-time employees. This is almost twice the rate for private industry as a whole. OSHA created a suite of resources to help hospitals assess workplace safety needs, implement safety and health management systems, and enhance their safe patient handling programs.

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Transitioning to Safer Chemicals: A Toolkit for Employers and Workers
Transitioning to Safer Chemicals

American workers use tens of thousands of chemicals every day. Establishing a chemical management system that goes beyond simply complying with OSHA standards and strives to reduce or eliminate chemical hazards at the source through informed substitution best protects workers. Transitioning to safer alternatives can be a complex undertaking, but a variety of existing resources make it easier. OSHA has developed this step-by-step toolkit to provide employers and workers with information, methods, tools, and guidance on using informed substitution in the workplace.

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Protecting Temporary Workers
Protecting Temporary Workers

"Host employers need to treat temporary workers as they treat existing employees. Temporary staffing agencies and host employers share control over the employee, and are therefore jointly responsible for temp employee's safety and health. It is essential that both employers comply with all relevant OSHA requirements."

— David Michaels, PhD, MPH, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health

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