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Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA

Inspection Detail

Inspection: 314827346 - Magic Mountain Llc

Inspection Information - Office: Ca Van Nuys

Nr: 314827346Report ID: 0950643Open Date: 10/07/2011

Magic Mountain Llc
26101 Magic Mountain Parkway
Valencia, CA 91355
Union Status: Union
SIC: 7996/Amusement Parks
NAICS: 713110/Amusement and Theme Parks

Inspection Type:Accident
Scope:Partial Advanced Notice:N
Ownership:Private
Safety/Health:Safety Close Conference:12/09/2011
Planning Guide: Safety-Manufacturing Close Case:10/07/2013

Related Activity:TypeIDSafetyHealth
 Accident102637436    
 Accident102637444    

Violation Summary
Serious Willful Repeat Other Unclass Total
Initial Violations 1 1
Current Violations 1 1
Initial Penalty $18,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $18,000
Current Penalty $0 $0 $0 $3,500 $0 $3,500
FTA Amount $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0

Violation Items
# ID Type Standard Issuance Abate Curr$ Init$ Fta$ Contest LastEvent
  1. 01001 Other 3314 G02 A 12/09/2011 01/11/2012 $3,500 $18,000 $0 12/21/2011 F - Formal Settlement

Accident Investigation Summary
Summary Nr: 202470886Event: 06/10/2011Employee'S Arm Is Fractured By Moving Train
On June 10, 2011 Employee #1, a ride electrician, and his coworker, an electrician, were responding to a "down call" on a TATSU Flying Roller Coaster. When Employee #1 and his coworker arrived at the location, they found the coaster was stopped partially in the station and partially out of the station with passengers still on board. Employee #1's coworker went to the main operating panel, while Employee #1 remained on the station platform. Employee #1 gathered a three-step step ladder and a long handle dust pan to use to fix the roller coaster. Employee #1 asked his supervisor to assist him by using his radio to communicate with his coworker located at the ride main control panel. Employee #1's supervisor stood next to him while he climbed onto the step ladder and positioned himself next to the "swing frame." Employee #1 leaned over the swing frame to place the dust pan over the power shoes. The power shoes were located on the upper portion of the train frame above the fourth and fifth seats. The power shoes must be protected when a train is moved in reverse because they will break off when they come in contact with the "bus rail," where they have to slide into in a pressed down position. Employee #1 used the dust pan to hold the "power shoes" in the down position. Employee #1 stated that the dust pan was not holding the "power shoes" in the down position so he had to hold onto the dust pan. Employee #1 told the ride supervisor to tell the electrician at the control panel to "go ahead and move the train." The train moved backward a few inches, while Employee #1 was holding the dust pan. Employee #1 and the ride supervisor went to the control panel and told his coworker that the train needed to be moved a few more inches backward. Employee #1 and the ride supervisor returned to their positions, and when Employee #1 was ready, he told the ride supervisor to tell his coworker to move the train backward. Employee #1 stated that when his coworker moved the train backward, it moved faster than he expected and pushed his left arm backwards against the frame of the ride, pinning it between the upright and the top of the train. Employee #1 yelled "stop" and he pulled his arm free. Employee #1 stepped down off the step ladder and walked toward the control panel, while using his radio to call for help. When Employee #1 reached the control panel, he sat down and attempted to call for help again. The ride supervisor called security on the radio. Security and emergency medical personnel responded a short time later. The paramedics were called, and Employee #1 was transported to the hospital, where he was treated for a fracture.
Keywords: structure moving, fracture, pinned, electrician, lockout, roller--mach/part, arm, train
Inspection Degree Nature Occupation
1 314827346 Hospitalized injury Fracture Electricians' apprentices

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