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Page last reviewed: 09/28/2007
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Sealant, Waterproofing, and Restoration Industry

Contractors, manufacturers, architects, project engineers and others engaged in the sealant, waterproofing, and restoration business are exposed to a wide range of hazards. The issues of greatest concern to the industry relate to lead and silica exposures, poor scaffolding, improper fall protection, and confined space entry.

OSHA requirements for the sealant, waterproofing, and restoration industry are addressed in specific standards for the construction industry.

OSHA Standards

This section highlights many of the construction industry standards.

Note: Twenty-five states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands have OSHA-approved State Plans and have adopted their own standards and enforcement policies. For the most part, these States adopt standards that are identical to Federal OSHA. However, some States have adopted different standards applicable to this topic or may have different enforcement policies.

Construction Industry (29 CFR 1926)

Hazards and Controls

The hazards experienced in the sealant, waterproofing, and restoration industry are common to the construction industry in general. These include health hazards; such as asphalt fumes, lead, silica, and solvents; as well as safety hazards, such as falls from elevation, awkward and heavy lifting, flammables, and power tools. An important step in addressing these hazards is to conduct task-specific hazard analyses to identify what hazards to expect and to then plan for their control.

General

  • Hazards and Safe Use of Multi-Component Chemical Products in Construction [21 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. OSHA and the Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance, (2012, June). SWR Institute developed a guidance document to help employers and workers identify key hazards, OSHA requirements, and safe handling procedures for multi-component products used in this industry.

  • Safety and Health Field Manual [1 MB PDF*, 52 pages]. A Spanish version [1 MB PDF*, 52 pages] is also available. OSHA and Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance, (2010, February). SWR Institute developed a manual to help employers and workers identify the key hazards and OSHA requirements in this industry.

  • Safety and Health Manual [1 MB PDF*, 120 pages]. OSHA and Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance, (2007, October). SWR Institute developed a manual to help employers understand how to develop a written safety and health program that covers topics such as hazard communication, confined space, fall protection, recordkeeping, personal protective equipment, respiratory protection and scaffolding.

  • Safety Toolbox Talks. OSHA and Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance. SWR Institute developed a series of toolbox talks to help employers and workers identify the key hazards and OSHA requirements in the construction industry:
  • Standards for Restoration and Guidelines for Restoring Historic Buildings: Health + Safety Considerations. National Park Service (NPS). Describes recommended work practices to preserve both worker safety and the historical appearance of buildings.

  • Construction. OSHA eTool. A Spanish version is also available. Contains information that helps workers identify and control the hazards that cause the most serious construction-related injuries.

Confined Spaces

Falls

  • Fall Protection [548 KB PDF*, 13 pages]. A Spanish version [555 KB PDF*, 13 pages] is also available. Through the OSHA Alliance Program Construction Roundtable Fall Protection Workgroup, the Sealant Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) developed "Fall Protection." The slide presentation addresses fall protection issues in the construction industry, including fall protection systems. (2007, June; Spanish translation 2009, April)

  • Toolbox Talk: Fall Protection [261 KB PDF*, 3 pages]. A Spanish version [185 KB PDF*, 4 pages] is also available. OSHA and Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance, (2012, January).

  • Fall Protection. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.

Lead

  • Lead. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.

Scaffolding

  • Toolbox Talk: Aerial Lift [52 KB PDF*, 2 pages]. A Spanish version [134 KB PDF*, 4 pages] is also available. OSHA and Sealant, Waterproofing and Restoration Institute (SWR Institute) Alliance, (2012, January).

  • Scaffolding. OSHA eTool. Provides illustrated examples of safe scaffolding. Hazards are identified, as well as the controls that keep those hazards from becoming tragedies.

  • Scaffolding. OSHA Safety and Health Topics Page.

Silica

Additional Information


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