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Reproductive Hazards

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Reproductive Hazards Menu

OSHA Standards

State Standards

There are twenty-eight OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

This section highlights OSHA standards, Federal Register notices (rules and proposed rules), and letters of interpretation (official letters of interpretation of the standards) related to reproductive hazards.

General Industry (29 CFR 1910)

  • 1910.97, Nonionizing radiation. Describes the kinds of non-ionizing radiation, warning symbols used and formula for calculating radiation levels which should not be exceeded.
  • 1910 Subpart Z, Toxic and hazardous substances [related topic page]
    • 1910.1000, Air contaminants. Identifies hazardous chemicals many of which are potential reproductive hazards.
    • 1910.1020, Access to employee exposure and medical records. OSHA requires the reporting of employee exposure to hazardous chemicals and allows access to these records by employees.
    • 1910.1025, Lead. Describes guidelines for hazard protection from lead exposure including reproductive hazards. [related topic page]
      • Appendix A, Substance data sheet for occupational exposure to lead
      • Appendix B, Employee standard summary
      • Appendix C, Medical surveillance guidelines
    • 1910.1030, Bloodborne pathogens. Describes requirements for protection from exposure to bloodborne pathogens. [related topic page]
    • 1910.1044, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane. Describes exposure hazards to reproductive health and provides requirements for partial protection from these risks.
      • Appendix A, Substance safety data sheet for DBCP
      • Appendix B, Substance technical guidelines for DBCP
      • Appendix C, Medical surveillance guidelines for DBCP
    • 1910.1047, Ethylene oxide. Provides requirements for safe handling of ethylene oxide which includes hazard protection for reproductive health. [related topic page]
      • Appendix A, Substance safety data sheet for ethylene oxide (Non-mandatory)
      • Appendix B, Substance technical guidelines for ethylene oxide (Non-mandatory)
      • Appendix C, Medical surveillance guidelines for ethylene oxide (Non-mandatory)
    • 1910.1096, Ionizing radiation. Describes types of ionizing radiation, warning symbols used, radiation levels which should not be exceeded and personal monitoring.
    • 1910.1200, Hazard communication. In compliance with this standard, all personnel involved in any aspect of the handling of covered hazardous chemicals must receive information and training to appraise them of these hazards in the work area. [related topic page]
Federal Register Notices
Letters of Interpretation

State Standards

There are twenty-eight OSHA-approved State Plans, operating state-wide occupational safety and health programs. State Plans are required to have standards and enforcement programs that are at least as effective as OSHA's and may have different or more stringent requirements.

This topics page is not a standard or regulation and it creates no new legal obligations. It contains recommendations as well as descriptions of mandatory safety and health standards. The recommendations are advisory in nature, informational in content and are intended to assist employers in providing a safe and healthful workplace. The Occupational Safety and Health Act requires employers to comply with safety and health standards and regulations promulgated by OSHA or by a state with an OSHA-approved state plan. In addition, the Act’s General Duty Clause, Section 5(a)(1), requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.

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