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Prevention Videos (v-Tools) | Construction Hazards


Every year in the U.S. more than 800 construction workers die and nearly 137,000 are seriously injured while on the job. Construction workers engage in many activities that may expose them to serious hazards, such as falling from rooftops, unguarded machinery, being struck by heavy construction equipment, electrocutions, silica dust, and asbestos.

The videos below show how quickly workers can be injured or killed on the job and are intended to assist those in the industry to identify, reduce, and eliminate construction-related hazards. Most of the videos are 2 to 4 minutes long, presented in clear, easily accessible vocabulary, and show common construction worksite activities. The videos may be used for employer and worker training. Each video presents:

  • A worksite incident based on true stories that resulted in worker injury or death.
  • Corrective actions for preventing these types of incidents.
NOTE: Please be advised that some of the videos deal with deaths at construction sites and might be disturbing for some people.

To launch any of the videos, mouse over the picture and click on a highlighted part of the picture, or click on an entry in the listing to the left of the picture.

Falls in Construction

Sprains and Strains in Construction

Struck-by Accidents in Construction

Carbon Monoxide in Construction

Excavations in Construction

Electrocutions in Construction

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