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Occupational Health Professionals

Occupational Health Professionals - Photo Credit: digitalplanetdesign.com | Copyright: Sean Locke
Occupational Health Professionals Menu

Overview

In Focus: Ebola

Ebola virus

Frederick A. Murphy/CDC

OSHA's Ebola webpage provides a comprehensive source of information for protecting workers from exposure to the Ebola virus.

Highlights

The goal of a multidisciplinary occupational health and safety team is to design, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive health and safety program that will maintain and enhance health, improve safety, and increase productivity. Such programs often provide similar results for the families of workers, with resultant financial and other benefits for the corporation. Occupational health and safety professionals include occupational and environmental health nurses, occupational medicine physicians, industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and occupational health psychologists. Other related members of the multidisciplinary team are ergonomists, toxicologists, epidemiologists, human resource specialists, and industrial/organizational psychologists.

Occupational health and safety professionals are persons who have been accredited through appropriate procedures to practice a profession related to occupational health or who provide occupational health services according to the provision of relevant regulations.

OSHA Standards

There are currently no specific OSHA standards for occupational health professionals.

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Selecting Occupational Health Professionals

Provides information about selecting occupational health professionals.

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Workers' Rights

Workers have the right to:

  • Working conditions that do not pose a risk of serious harm.
  • Receive information and training (in a language and vocabulary the worker understands) about workplace hazards, methods to prevent them, and the OSHA standards that apply to their workplace.
  • Review records of work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • File a complaint asking OSHA to inspect their workplace if they believe there is a serious hazard or that their employer is not following OSHA's rules. OSHA will keep all identities confidential.
  • Exercise their rights under the law without retaliation, including reporting an injury or raising health and safety concerns with their employer or OSHA. If a worker has been retaliated against for using their rights, they must file a complaint with OSHA as soon as possible, but no later than 30 days.

For additional information, see OSHA's Workers page.

How to Contact OSHA

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov or call OSHA at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742), TTY 1-877-889-5627.

In Focus: Ebola

Ebola virus

Frederick A. Murphy/CDC

OSHA's Ebola webpage provides a comprehensive source of information for protecting workers from exposure to the Ebola virus.

Highlights

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