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Industry Segments and Controlling Hazards

This section identifies some of the major industry segments involved in the manufacturing of concrete and concrete products, and in construction work with concrete. It also lists some of the leading workplace hazards for these industries and links to safety and health resources for controlling these hazards.


General Hazard Resources

Amputations

Confined Spaces

  • Permit-Required Confined Spaces (PDF). OSHA Publication 3138-01R, (2004). Provides a general overview of procedures for protecting workers from the hazards of confined spaces using permit-required entry plans.
  • Worker Deaths in Confined Spaces. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 94-103, (1994, January). Contains summary data and investigative reports of fatal incidents involving workers who entered confined spaces.
  • Preventing Occupational Fatalities in Confined Spaces. US Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No. 86-110, (1986, January). Describes several fatal confined spaces incidents and makes recommendations for preventing similar events.
  • Investigations of Fatal Confined Space Incidents. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report: NIOSH FACE Reports and State-Based Reports.
  • For additional information, see OSHA's Confined Spaces Safety and Health Topics Page.

Dermal (Skin) Hazards

  • Preventing Skin Problems from Working with Portland Cement. OSHA Guidance Document, (2008). Employees may suffer dermal hazards in working with wet cement such as cement burns (due to its caustic nature) and inflammation of the skin (either due to irritant or allergic contact dermatitis). This guidance addresses ways to prevent or minimize skin problems through the proper selection and use of gloves, boots and other personal protective equipment such as kneepads; proper skin care and work practices such as use of pH neutral or slightly acidic soaps; and ways of making cement products less hazardous.
  • An Employer's Guide to Skin Protection. Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety & Health (elcosh), (2000). Provides guidance for employers to prevent skin problems in employees who work with wet cement products.
  • A Safety & Health Practitioner's Guide to Skin Protection. Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety & Health (elcosh), (2000). Provides a detailed reference on dermal exposure related to cement products.
  • Save Your Skin Toolbox Talk. Electronic Library of Construction Occupational Safety & Health (elcosh), (1999). Toolbox session on the causes and prevention of skin problems from Portland cement products.
  • For additional information, see OSHA's Dermal Exposure Safety and Health Topics Page.

Electrical Hazards

Fall Protection

Respiratory Hazards

Silica and Other Hazardous Substances

Struck-By/Caught Between

Truck Driving

  • Ready Mixed Concrete Truck Drivers: Work-Related Hazards and Recommendations for Controls. Electronic Library of Construction Safety & Health (elcosh), Center for Construction Research and Training (CPWR). Consists of a hazard assessment of truck drivers in the industry and a summary of identified work-related hazards and safety recommendations.
  • Chipping out the Drum: Safe Work Practices. Georgia Tech Research Corporation. Produced under OSHA Susan Harwood Training Grant number 46D3-HT02. Training materials for workers who chip out hardened concrete from the interior of mixer drums on concrete trucks.

*Accessibility Assistance: Contact OSHA's Directorate of Technical Support and Emergency Management at (202) 693-2300 for assistance accessing PDF materials.

All other documents, that are not PDF materials or formatted for the web, are available as Microsoft Office® formats and videos and are noted accordingly. If additional assistance is needed with reading, reviewing or accessing these documents or any figures and illustrations, please also contact OSHA's Directorate of Technical Support and Emergency Management at (202) 693-2300.

**eBooks - EPUB is the most common format for e-Books. If you use a Sony Reader, a Nook, or an iPad you can download the EPUB file format. If you use a Kindle, you can download the MOBI file format.

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