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Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents
• Part Number: 1904
• Part Title: Recording and Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illness
• Subpart: E
• Subpart Title: Reporting Fatality, Injury and Illness Information to the Government
• Standard Number: 1904.39
• Title: Reporting fatalities, hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye as a result of work-related incidents to OSHA.
• GPO Source: e-CFR

1904.39(a)

Basic requirement.

1904.39(a)(1)

Within eight (8) hours after the death of any employee as a result of a work-related incident, you must report the fatality to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), U.S. Department of Labor.

1904.39(a)(2)

Within twenty-four (24) hours after the in-patient hospitalization of one or more employees or an employee's amputation or an employee's loss of an eye, as a result of a work-related incident, you must report the in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA.

1904.39(a)(3)

You must report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye using one of the following methods:

1904.39(a)(3)(i)

By telephone or in person to the OSHA Area Office that is nearest to the site of the incident.

1904.39(a)(3)(ii)

By telephone to the OSHA toll-free central telephone number, 1-800-321-OSHA (1-800-321-6742).

1904.39(a)(3)(iii)

By electronic submission using the reporting application located on OSHA's public Web site at www.osha.gov.

1904.39(b)

Implementation

1904.39(b)(1)

If the Area Office is closed, may I report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye by leaving a message on OSHA's answering machine, faxing the Area Office, or sending an email? No, if the Area Office is closed, you must report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye using either the 800 number or the reporting application located on OSHA's public Web site at www.osha.gov.

1904.39(b)(2)

What information do I need to give to OSHA about the in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye? You must give OSHA the following information for each fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye:

1904.39(b)(2)(i)

The establishment name;

1904.39(b)(2)(ii)

The location of the work-related incident;

1904.39(b)(2)(iii)

The time of the work-related incident;

1904.39(b)(2)(iv)

The type of reportable event (i.e., fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye);

1904.39(b)(2)(v)

The number of employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;

1904.39(b)(2)(vi)

The names of the employees who suffered a fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye;

1904.39(b)(2)(vii)

Your contact person and his or her phone number; and

1904.39(b)(2)(viii)

A brief description of the workrelated incident.

1904.39(b)(3)

Do I have to report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye if it resulted from a motor vehicle accident on a public street or highway? If the motor vehicle accident occurred in a construction work zone, you must report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye. If the motor vehicle accident occurred on a public street or highway, but not in a construction work zone, you do not have to report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA. However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.

1904.39(b)(4)

Do I have to report the fatality, inpatient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye if it occurred on a commercial or public transportation system? No, you do not have to report the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye to OSHA if it occurred on a commercial or public transportation system (e.g., airplane, train, subway, or bus). However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.

1904.39(b)(5)

Do I have to report a work-related fatality or in-patient hospitalization caused by a heart attack? Yes, your local OSHA Area Office director will decide whether to investigate the event, depending on the circumstances of the heart attack.

1904.39(b)(6)

What if the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye does not occur during or right after the work-related incident? You must only report a fatality to OSHA if the fatality occurs within thirty (30) days of the work-related incident. For an in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye, you must only report the event to OSHA if it occurs within twenty-four (24) hours of the work-related incident. However, the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye must be recorded on your OSHA injury and illness records, if you are required to keep such records.

1904.39(b)(7)

What if I don't learn about a reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye right away? If you do not learn about a reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye at the time it takes place, you must make the report to OSHA within the following time period after the fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye is reported to you or to any of your agent(s): Eight (8) hours for a fatality, and twenty-four (24) hours for an in-patient hospitalization, an amputation, or a loss of an eye.

1904.39(b)(8)

What if I don't learn right away that the reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye was the result of a work-related incident? If you do not learn right away that the reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye was the result of a work-related incident, you must make the report to OSHA within the following time period after you or any of your agent(s) learn that the reportable fatality, in-patient hospitalization, amputation, or loss of an eye was the result of a work-related incident: Eight (8) hours for a fatality, and twenty-four (24) hours for an inpatient hospitalization, an amputation, or a loss of an eye.

1904.39(b)(9)

How does OSHA define "in-patient hospitalization"? OSHA defines inpatient hospitalization as a formal admission to the in-patient service of a hospital or clinic for care or treatment.

1904.39(b)(10)

Do I have to report an in-patient hospitalization that involves only observation or diagnostic testing? No, you do not have to report an in-patient hospitalization that involves only observation or diagnostic testing. You must only report to OSHA each inpatient hospitalization that involves care or treatment.

1904.39(b)(11)

How does OSHA define "amputation"? An amputation is the traumatic loss of a limb or other external body part. Amputations include a part, such as a limb or appendage, that has been severed, cut off, amputated (either completely or partially); fingertip amputations with or without bone loss; medical amputations resulting from irreparable damage; amputations of body parts that have since been reattached. Amputations do not include avulsions, enucleations, deglovings, scalpings, severed ears, or broken or chipped teeth.
[66 FR 6133, Jan. 19, 2001; 79 FR 56187-56188, September 18, 2014]

Next Standard (1904.40)

Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents

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