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Region 5 News Release: 14-1312-CHI
July 31, 2014
Contact: Scott Allen      Rhonda Burke
Phone:       312-353-6976

Major Metals Co. cited by US Department of Labor's OSHA for exposing
workers to amputation and other serious hazards

MANSFIELD, Ohio – Major Metals Co. has been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration for 10 serious safety violations after receiving a complaint alleging hazards at the facility. OSHA proposed penalties of $41,300 for failing to protect workers from amputation*, fall and other hazards at the Mansfield-based steel tubing manufacturer.

"Failing to protect workers from a machine's moving parts exposes them to risk of serious injuries, such as amputation and lacerations. Despite thousands of injuries each year, lack of adequate machine guarding continues to be one of the most frequently cited OSHA violations," said Kim Nelson, OSHA's area director in Toledo. "Employers have a responsibility to implement safe work practices, follow manufacturer guidelines and prevent injuries. In 21st century America, no worker should be exposed to preventable injuries on the job."

OSHA's inspection found workers were exposed to the moving and grinding parts of machinery while setting up machines. OSHA issued citations because the company did not have specific lockout/tagout procedures* and machine guarding. The company also was cited for failure to train workers properly on using machines safely.

Major Metals was cited for failure to have a guardrail on a platform adjacent to a metal pit, which exposed workers to a 10-foot fall hazard. Workers were exposed to eye injuries from welding rays because the company did not enclose the welding station with a noncombustible or flameproof screen or shield.

Additional violations involved the use of forklifts, including failure to remove damaged forklifts from use that needed repair or service; train operators in forklift protocols; perform daily inspections; and leaving equipment unattended. Yearly, thousands of workers are injured, sometimes fatally, while operating forklifts. The most common injuries occur when the forklift overturns, workers fall from the vehicle or pedestrians are hit.

A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Major Metals attended an informal meeting with OSHA on July 29, 2014, and have abated all the violations and agreed to pay a penalty of $22,750. In addition, they have sent two managers to attend an OSHA 30 hour General Industry Safety class.

To ask questions, obtain compliance assistance, file a complaint, or report workplace hospitalizations, fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, the public should call OSHA's toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742) or the agency's Toledo Area Office at 419-259-7542.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions exist for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit

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U.S. Department of Labor news materials are accessible at The department's Reasonable Accommodation Resource Center converts departmental information and documents into alternative formats, which include Braille and large print. For alternative format requests, please contact the department at (202) 693-7828 (voice) or (800) 877-8339 (federal relay).

* Accessibility Assistance Contact OSHA's Office of Communications at 202-693-1999 for assistance accessing PDF materials.

OSHA News Release - Table of Contents

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