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Region 4 News Release: 09-632-ATL (176)
June 18, 2009
Contact: Michael D'Aquino     Michael Wald
Phone: 404-562-2076     404-562-2078

U. S. Department of Labor's OSHA focuses on combustible dust hazards at Mississippi companies

ATLANTA -- Over the last 16 months, compliance officers from the U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have made nine visits to Mississippi companies where employees may be exposed to potential combustible dust hazards.

The result has been 67 citations for workplace safety and health violations, with 88 percent categorized as willful, serious, repeat or failure to abate.

The visits are part of the agency's ongoing National Emphasis Program to reduce employees' exposure to combustible dust hazards. Nationally, 3,662 violations have been identified during 813 inspections. Housekeeping, hazard communication, personal protective equipment, electrical and general duty clause violations are cited most frequently as a result of these inspections.

"Any company that has combustible dust, or thinks it may have combustible dust, needs to intensify housekeeping, review hot work processes, evaluate electrical equipment for possible Class II locations, prohibit smoking or flames in dust laden areas, ensure that relief venting on dust collection systems releases the dust to a safe location, and develop and/or review an emergency action plan," said OSHA Regional Administrator Cindy Coe.

Dust fires and explosions can pose significant dangers in the workplace and can occur when five different factors are present. The five factors are oxygen, an ignition source (heat, an electrical spark or a spark from metal machinery), fuel (dust), dispersion of the dust and confinement of the dust. These five factors are referred to as the "Dust Explosion Pentagon." If any one of these factors is removed or is missing, an explosion cannot occur.

Industries affected by the emphasis program include: agriculture, chemical, textile, forest products, furniture products, wastewater treatment, metal processing, paper processing, pharmaceutical and metal, paper and plastic recycling.

OSHA develops National Emphasis Programs to focus on major health and safety hazards that are recognized as nationally significant. These programs provide guidance to the OSHA field offices for planning and conducting inspections consistently across the nation. Additional information regarding this initiative is available from the OSHA regional office located at 61 Forsyth St. S.W., Atlanta, GA 30303; telephone 404-562-2300.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, OSHA's role is to assure safe and healthful working conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, outreach and education. For more information, visit


U.S. Department of Labor releases are accessible on the Internet at The information in this news release will be made available in alternate format (large print, Braille, audiotape or disc) from the COAST office upon request. Please specify which news release when placing your request at 202-693-7828 or TTY 202-693-7755. The Labor Department is committed to providing America's employers and employees with easy access to understandable information on how to comply with its laws and regulations. For more information, please visit

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