US Dept of Labor

Occupational Safety & Health AdministrationWe Can Help

OSHA News Release - Table of Contents
Trade News Release Banner Image

Region 4 News Release: 09-1554-ATL (436)
Dec. 23, 2009
Contact: Michael Wald     Michael D'Aquino
Phone: 404-562-2078     404-562-2076

US Department of Labor's OSHA cites Walt Disney World following monorail collision and issues recommendation letter following actor's death

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has cited Walt Disney World for safety violations following the fatality of a monorail driver in July and issued a recommendation letter concerning the death of an actor during a stage production at the theme park in August.

In early July, one worker was killed when two monorail trains collided while switching tracks. One was holding while another was being removed from the loop and transferred to the express loop where it would travel to the maintenance shop. The command was given for the switching operation to move one train to the express loop, but switch beams eight and nine were not locked into position or energized. When one train traveled in reverse it remained on the loop and struck the other train, fatally injuring the operator.

Walt Disney World is being cited with a serious violation for not providing a place of employment free from recognized hazards that could cause death or serious harm by exposing employees to struck-by collision hazards.

During the monorail investigation, inspectors observed three violations unrelated to the fatality. Two repeat violations are being cited for exposing employees to fall hazards without fall protection and not providing educational training for monorail employees in the use of a portable fire extinguisher. A serious violation was found as well in which a drill press did not have a guard installed.

Additionally, on Aug. 8, an actor was fatally injured from injuries sustained during the Pirates of the Caribbean tutorial stage show when he hit a concrete wall on a new stage, which had opened in July. While no OSHA violations are being proposed for the incident, the agency is recommending that employees rehearse on new stages before their first live performance.

"With the monorail, Disney should have put procedures in place that would have prevented the fatal crash from occurring," said OSHA Assistant Secretary Dr. David Michaels. "Employers need to take effective and ongoing corrective action to protect the health and safety of their workers. In the case of the actor's death, OSHA feels that greater familiarity with the new stage might have changed the outcome."

OSHA has proposed a total of $44,000 in penalties against the company for the monorail incident, including a penalty of $7,000 for the serious violation related to the fatality, the maximum amount allowed for a serious citation.

The company has 15 business days from receipt of the citations to comply, ask for an informal meeting with OSHA's area director or indicate that it plans to contest the citations and proposed penalties before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. The site was inspected by staff from OSHA's Tampa Area Office, 5807 Breckenridge Parkway, Suite A; telephone 813-626-1177.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, OSHA's role is to promote safe and healthful working conditions for America's men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, outreach and education. For more information, visit


U.S. Department of Labor releases are accessible on the Internet at The information in this news release will be made available in alternate format (large print, Braille, audiotape or disc) from the COAST office upon request. Please specify which news release when placing your request at 202-693-7828 or TTY 202-693-7755. The Labor Department is committed to providing America's employers and employees with easy access to understandable information on how to comply with its laws and regulations. For more information, please visit

OSHA News Release - Table of Contents

Thank You for Visiting Our Website

You are exiting the Department of Labor's Web server.

The Department of Labor does not endorse, takes no responsibility for, and exercises no control over the linked organization or its views, or contents, nor does it vouch for the accuracy or accessibility of the information contained on the destination server. The Department of Labor also cannot authorize the use of copyrighted materials contained in linked Web sites. Users must request such authorization from the sponsor of the linked Web site. Thank you for visiting our site. Please click the button below to continue.