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News Release USDL: 96-469
Friday, November 8, 1996
Contact: Frank Kane, (202) 219-8151

OSHA Extends Period For Comments On California Hazard Communication Standard Nov. 26

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is extending until Nov. 26, 1996, the period for comments on California's state hazard communication standard, which incorporates the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, also known as Proposition 65.

OSHA received more than 45 requests for an extension of the comment period. Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Joseph A. Dear said, "We understand that this is a very complex issue and there are many interested parties wishing to file detailed comments. However, Congress has directed that OSHA expedite its review and approval or rejection of the California standard and provide a report by Jan. 1, 1997. Therefore we are extending the comment period for a two-week period, rather than for the requested 60 days."

A Federal Register notice announcing the extension until Nov. 26, 1996, will be published in the near future.

The California standard goes beyond the federal hazard communication standard both in content and enforcement.

Proposition 65, part of the California standard, requires businesses with 10 or more employees to provide individuals with clear and reasonable warning if the individual is exposed to a chemical known by the state to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity. A product label or a sign can serve as the warning in the workplace. California annually publishes a list of chemicals known to cause cancer or reproductive toxicity.

In addition to enforcement through the California state plan system of citations and proposed penalties, Proposition 65 also provides for supplemental enforcement including civil lawsuits.

Where a state standard adopted in an OSHA-approved state health and safety plan differs significantly from a comparable federal standard, the Occupational Safety and Health Act requires it to be "at least as effective" as the federal standard. In addition, if the standard applies to a product distributed or used in interstate commerce, it must be required by compelling local conditions and not pose any undue burden on interstate commerce.

OSHA is seeking comment on whether the California hazard communication standard meets those requirements.

Written comments should be submitted in quadruplicate by Nov. 26, 1996, to Docket T-032, Docket Office, Room N-2625, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C., 20210. Comments less than 10 pages long may be sent by telefax to the Docket Office at (202) 219-5046 but must be followed by a mailed submission in quadruplicate.


Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

OSHA News Release - (Archived) Table of Contents

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