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Region 4 News Release   ATL 03-181
Thurs. July 10, 2003
Contact: Ben Ross           Jo Anne Burgoyne
Phone: (404) 562-2284       (404) 562-2076


OSHA Offers Employers Tools to Recognize and Eliminate
Occupational Electrical Hazards
Approach Aimed at Reducing Major Cause of Worker Fatalities in Southeast

ATLANTA -- Electrical work can be hazardous, and accidents involving electrical work can often be fatal. The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigated 46 worker fatalities involving electrical hazards in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi between Oct. 1, 2001 and Sept. 30, 2002.

OSHA wants to help employers keep workers safe and healthy. Agency offices in the Southeast (list attached) are offering a free "Electrical Outreach" compact disc to assist employers in preventing worker exposure to the hazards commonly found in performing electrical work.

Along with training presentations and Internet links, the CD contains actual photographs of various electrical hazards, discusses the OSHA regulations that are related to the depicted hazards, and provides information about how to remove or correct hazards before an employee is injured.

Because 23 of the 46 fatalities involved workers coming in contact with overhead electrical power lines, the agency has also developed a regional emphasis program to address potential hazards at these worksites.

"Recognizing and eliminating electrical safety hazards is key to preventing these tragic accidents," said Cindy Coe Laseter, OSHA's regional administrator for the Southeast. "Using outreach and training, along with a strong enforcement program, the agency is alerting employers and employees to these serious safety hazards. We are hopeful that our efforts will help employers prevent needless deaths."

As part of this effort to reduce worker fatalities, investigators will address electrical hazards during inspections at other worksites and distribute special outreach materials where electrical hazards could potentially be encountered.

Six of the 46 fatalities involved workers who were exposed to electrical hazards as they installed plumbing, heating and air-conditioning units or cables. Federal OSHA offices in the Southeast are mailing advisory letters to cable installing, plumbing, heating and air-conditioning companies advising them of electrical hazards associated with their industries.

For more information or to obtain copies of the electrical safety material, visit www.osha.gov, contact a local OSHA office, listed in the government section of the phone book, or call the Atlanta regional office at (404) 562-2300.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is dedicated to saving lives, preventing injuries and illnesses, and protecting America's workers. Safety and health add value to business, the workplace and life.

Editors Note: Listed below are the phone numbers for federal OSHA area offices in the Southeast:


Alabama: Birmingham - 205-731-1534
Mobile - 251-441-6131

Florida: Ft. Lauderdale - 954-424-0242
Jacksonville - 904-232-2895
Tampa - 813-626-1177

Georgia: Atlanta-East - 770-493-6644
Atlanta-West - 770-984-8700
Savannah - 912-652-4393

Kentucky: Frankfort - 502-227-7024

Mississippi: Jackson - 601-965-4606

South Carolina: Columbia - 803-765-5904

North Carolina: Raleigh - 919-856-4770

Tennessee: Nashville - 615-781-5423



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Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

OSHA News Release - (Archived) Table of Contents

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