Standard Interpretations - Table of Contents Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents
• Standard Number: 1904.8
• Status: Archived

Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

May 26, 1994

Mr. Lawrence P. Halprin
Keller and Heckman
1001 G Street, N.W.
Suite 500
West Washington, D.C. 20001

Dear Mr. Halprin:

Thank you for your letter dated April 21, requesting clarification on the revised requirements for reporting occupational fatalities and multiple hospitalization incidents to OSHA.

Your interpretation of the revised requirements, as outlined in your letter is correct. The reporting requirements apply only to the in-patient hospitalization or death of employees of an employer. Employees include all full and part-time employees. In addition, all workers who are supervised on a day-to-day basis by a given employer are considered employees of the using firm for recording and reporting purposes.

I hope you find this information useful. If you have any further questions, please contact us at Area Code: (202) 219-6463.

Sincerely,



Stephen A. Newell
Director
Office of Statistics




April 21, 1994

Mr. Steven A. Newell
Director, Office of Statistics
Room N3507
Department of Labor - OSHA
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20010

Re: 29 CFR 1904.8, The Reporting of Fatality or Multiple Hospitalizaton Incidence

Dear Mr. Newell:

The purpose of this letter is to confirm your oral advice regarding OSHA's interpretation of the referenced rule with respect to the issue described below.

Revised Section 1904.8 states, in part, that "the employer of any employees so affected shall report the incident . . ." Based on our discussions with you, it is our understanding that, regardless of how many individuals are hospitalized in a particular incident (and assuming no fatalities), an employer would have no reporting obligations under 1904.8 unless at least three of its "employees" were hospitalized on an in-patient basis. This interpretation is illustrated by the following example.

Assume a work-related incident causes five people to be hospitalized on an in-patient basis and that there are no deaths. Also assume that three of the hospitalized individuals are employed by Employer A, and two of the hospitalized individuals are employed by Employer B.

Under the facts of this example, our understanding of the application 1904.8 is as follows: 1) Employer A would be required to report the incident and the hospitalization of its three employees; 2) Employer A would not be required to report or be familiar with the hospitalization of three employees of Employer B; and 3) Employer B would have no reporting obligation because less than three of its employees were hospitalized.

Please confirm that our interpretation accurately reflects the Agency's position on this issue. If you have any questions regarding our request, please give us a call.

Cordially yours,



Lawrence P. Halprin


Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.


Standard Interpretations - Table of Contents Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents