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Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents
• Standard Number: 1904
• Status: Archived

Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

May 24, 1993

Mr. Thomas E. Glass
Safety Engineer
ICI Polyurethanes Group
West Deptford Division
286 Mantua Grove Road West
Deptford, New Jersey 08066-1732

Dear Mr. Glass:

Thank you for your letter dated March 22, requesting an interpretation of the proper recording of a case on the OSHA 200 Log. When possible, I will cite the Recordkeeping Guidelines for Occupational Injuries and Illnesses by stating the appropriate page and Q&A numbers.

Q&A C-19 on page 36 of the Guidelines states "Employees who travel on company business shall be considered to be engaged in work related activities all the time they spend in the interest of the company, including, but not limited to, travel to and from customer contacts, and entertaining or being entertained for the purpose of transacting, discussing, or promoting business, etc. However, an injury/illness would not be recordable if it occurred during normal living activities (eating, sleeping, recreation)..." To determine whether the injury to your employee was work related or not, you must determine if the snowmobiling included transacting/promoting/discussing business or was solely for recreational purposes. If you determine that transacting/ promoting/discussing business was involved, the case should remain on your OSHA 200 Log. If you determine that the snowmobiling was for recreational purposes only, line the entry out and document the case as to why it was not work related.

I hope you find this information useful. If you have any further questions, please call my staff at Area Code (202) 219-6463.

Sincerely,



Stephen A. Newell
Director
Office of Statistics

Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents

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