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Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

March 10, 1993

Mr. Ed Leech
Mechanics Limited, Inc.
P.O. Box 193405
Little Rock, Arkansas 72219

Dear Mr. Leech:

This is in response to your February 17 letter requesting a recommendation or an approval from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for your hoist hook remote release device.

Please be advised that OSHA does not approve nor endorse products. The variable working conditions at jobsites and possible alterations or misapplication of an otherwise safe product could easily create a hazardous condition beyond the control of the manufacturer. However, we have reviewed the product data enclosed with your letter and it appears that if the remote release device is properly installed and used, the hazards associated with handling materials with cranes could be reduced.

Sincerely,



Roy F. Gurnham, Esq., P.E.
Director
Office of Construction and Maritime
Compliance Assistance




February 17, 1993

Mr. Dale Cavanaugh, Room N-3610
O.S.H.A.
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

Dear Mr. Cavanaugh:

Per our telephone conversation, here is the material and video that I have made up to help market my patent.

I have a demonstration to put on through the Houston Business Round Table on March 24, 1993.

If I could get a letter of some type of recommendation or approval through your office before that date it would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much.

Sincerely,



Ed Leech



February 17, 1993

Mr. Dale Cavanaugh, Room N-3610
O.S.H.A.
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20210

We have recently patented and are now in the process of manufacturing a safety device which we would like to introduce to the construction trades.

The device itself is very simple, its function very important. It is a system for remotely actuating the safety latch associated with a hoist hook.

In most crane applications, during steel and/or pre-stressed concrete erection, and other types of heavy rigging, it is not uncommon for workers to tie the safety latch of the hook back so that the hook remains open.

This is typically done because, once the load has been placed in position the hook end of the crane's cable and the safety latch is not always readily accessible so as to allow easy manual opening of the latch to release the rigging. It is not uncommon for the rigging on the hook to jump loose while the load is being stood, positioned or set, thereby, creating an extremely dangerous condition. This tying back the safety latch on the lift hook is known in the trade as "mousing the latch" and is a very unsafe practice.

Accordingly, our new system provides a device which actuates the safety latch of a lift hook from a remote location enabling the safety latch to remain closed during all crane application.

A.N.S.I. regulations and O.S.H.A. requirements state that the safety latch must be attached in all lift type hooks, consequently, many companies engage an additional piece of equipment and additional personnel to accomplish the unhooking of the loads after positioning.

Our system eliminates all these problems at a fraction of the cost.

We would welcome the opportunity to discuss this application with you. We will contact you in a few days to be sure you have received this information. We at Mechanics Limited believe that our system is a faster, more cost efficient and most importantly the safest method in the construction industry today. It can be installed and removed in minutes and is virtually maintenance free. If you would like more information, video or a demonstration at one of your job sites please contact us at Mechanics Limited, 501-888-7707 or FAX: 501-888-7173.

Sincerely,



E. Ray Stalnaker
President


Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.


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