Standard Interpretations - Table of Contents Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents
• Status: Archived

Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.

March 5, 1992

MEMORANDUM FOR:     MICHAEL G. CONNORS
                   REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR

FROM:               PATRICIA K. CLARK, DIRECTOR DIRECTORATE OF COMPLIANCE
                   PROGRAMS

SUBJECT:            Interpretation on Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)
                   Policy--Criminal-Willful Case
This is in response to your memorandum of January 7, Subject: Criminal Willful Cases, which referred to a memorandum dated December 30, 1991, on "Updating Procedures for Criminal Willful Cases." You requested a clear statement of FOIA policy regarding documents requested to update procedures for criminal-willful cases to be made part of a case file that would not be disclosable under the FOIA, exemptions 5 and 7.

Under the FOIA, if a case is open, Exemption 7(A) can be used to protect all the information requested. Once the case is closed, other exemptions may be applicable as follows:

Exemption 5 can be used to protect predecisional opinions and recommendations. However, if the document is post-decisional, and explains the reasons for the decision, then this privilege does not apply.

Exemption 7 will still protect witness identities and other private information about witnesses under Exemptions 7(C) and 7(D). In addition, since the investigation is a criminal-willful, even information provided by a source which is not source identifying can also be protected.

Exemptions 7(E) and 2 can be used to protect information which, if released, could allow someone to circumvent the law. Therefore, if releasing the criteria (as outlined in the OSHA Field Operations Manual), which was used to judge whether a violation was criminal-willful, would allow someone to use that information to circumvent the law, it can be protected. Likewise, if the information provided from a Regional Office shows how they are interpreting the criteria, such that someone could use that information to avoid a criminal-willful citation, then that information can be protected.

A particular disclosure danger would be the ability of adverse parties to gain insight into OSHA's general strategic and tactical approach to deciding when an inspection results in a criminal-willful case. Therefore, information contained in a case file, such as opinions, conclusions, and recommendations written by Federal personnel in evaluating a Federal criminal-willful case, or a decision not to cite criminal, are "For Internal Use Only", in which case the information shall not be disclosed.

These interpretations are provided from the FOIA Disclosure Officer, Directorate of Compliance Programs, in cooperation with Miriam Miller, Co-Counsel for Administrative Law, and Joseph Plick, Staff Attorney, FOIA Unit, Department of Labor.


Archive Notice - OSHA Archive

NOTICE: This is an OSHA Archive Document, and may no longer represent OSHA Policy. It is presented here as historical content, for research and review purposes only.


Standard Interpretations - Table of Contents Standard Interpretations - (Archived) Table of Contents