Federal Registers - Table of Contents Federal Registers - Table of Contents
• Publication Date: 06/10/2009
• Publication Type: Notice
• Fed Register #: 74:27562-27570
• Title: Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2009

[Federal Register: June 10, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 110)]
[Notices]               
[Page 27562-27570]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10jn09-87]                         

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DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

 
Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2009

AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Labor.

ACTION: Initial announcement of availability of funds and solicitation 
for grant applications (SGA).

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    Funding Opportunity No.: SHTG-FY-09-02.
    Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance No.: 17.502.
SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration (OSHA) awards funds to nonprofit organizations to 
provide training and educational programs for employers and workers 
about safety and health topics selected by OSHA. Nonprofit 
organizations, including qualifying labor unions and community-based 
and faith-based organizations that are not an agency of a State or 
local government are eligible to apply. Additionally, State or local 
government-supported institutions of higher education are eligible to 
apply in accordance with 29 CFR part 95. This notice announces grant 
availability for Susan Harwood Training Program grants. All information 
and forms needed to apply for this funding opportunity are published as 
part of this SGA or are available on the Grants.gov site.

DATES: Grant applications must be received electronically by the 
Grants.gov system no later than 4:30 p.m., E.T., on Friday, July 24, 
2009, the application deadline date.

ADDRESSES: Applications for grants submitted under this competition 
must be submitted electronically using the government-wide Grants.gov 
Apply site at: http://www.grants.gov. If applying online poses a 
hardship to any applicant, the OSHA Directorate of Training and 
Education will provide assistance to ensure that applications are 
submitted online by the closing date. Applicants must contact the OSHA 
Directorate of Training and Education office listed on the announcement 
at least one week prior to the application deadline date (or no later 
than 4:30 p.m., E.T., on July 17, 2009) to speak to a representative 
who can provide assistance to ensure that applications are submitted 
online by the closing date. Requests for extensions to this deadline 
will not be granted. Further information regarding submitting your 
grant application electronically is listed in Section IV, Item 3, 
Submission Date, Times, and Addresses.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Any questions regarding this SGA 
should be directed to Cynthia Bencheck, Program Analyst, e-mail 
address: bencheck.cindy@dol.gov, tel: 847-297-4810 (note that this is 
not a toll-free number), or Jim Barnes, Director, Office of Training 
and Educational Programs, e-mail address: barnes.jim@dol.gov, tel: 847-
297-4810 (note that this is not a toll-free number). To obtain further 
information on the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program of the U.S. 
Department of Labor, visit the OSHA Web site at: http://www.osha.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 

I. Funding Opportunity Description

Overview of the Susan Harwood Training Grant Program

    The Susan Harwood Training Grant Program provides funds for 
programs to train workers and employers to recognize, avoid, and 
prevent safety and health hazards in their workplaces. The program 
emphasizes four areas:
     Educating workers and employers in small businesses. For 
purposes of this grant program, a small business is one with 250 or 
fewer employees.
     Training workers and employers about new OSHA standards.
     Training at-risk worker and employer populations.
     Training workers and employers about high risk activities 
or hazards identified by OSHA through the Department of Labor's 
Strategic Plan, or as part of an OSHA special emphasis program.

Grant Category Being Announced

    Under this solicitation for grant applications, OSHA will accept 
applications for the Targeted Topic training grant category. The 
emphasis for applications submitted for the Target Topic training grant 
category should be on conducting training for multiple employers and 
their workers addressing safety and health hazards associated with one 
of the selected training topic areas listed below.

Topics for the Targeted Topic Training Category

    Organizations funded for Targeted Topic training category grants 
are expected to develop and provide occupational safety and health 
training and/or educational programs addressing one of the topics 
selected by OSHA; recruit workers and employers for the training; and 
conduct and evaluate the training. Grantees are also expected to 
conduct follow-up evaluations with individuals trained by their program 
to determine what, if any, changes were made to reduce hazards in their 
workplaces as a result of the training. If your organization plans to 
train workers or employers in any of the 26 states operating OSHA-
approved State Plans, State OSHA requirements for that state must be 
included in the training.
    Twenty-four different training topics were selected for this grant 
announcement. OSHA may award grants for some or all of the listed 
Targeted Topic training topics.
    Applicants are required to focus their grant application proposal 
to address only one of the training topics from the list of 24 training 
topics OSHA has selected for this grant solicitation. Applicants 
wishing to address more than one of the announced grant training topics 
must submit a separate grant application for each topic. Each 
application must propose a plan for developing and conducting training 
programs addressing the recognition and prevention of safety and health 
hazards that focuses on one of the training topics listed below.
Training Topics That Address Construction Industry Hazards
    Programs that train workers and employers in the recognition and 
prevention of safety and health hazards addressing one of the following 
training topic areas.
1. Crane Safety, including but not limited to the following subtopics: 
safety hazards relating to Derricks, Overhead Hazards, and Tower Cranes
2. Fall Protection, including but not limited to the following 
subtopics:
Ladders, Roofs, Scaffolds, and Steel Erection
3. Construction Focus Four hazards, integrating all four elements in 
training programs: Falls, Electrocution, Caught-in and Struck-by
4. Health Hazards in Construction, including but not limited to the 
following subtopics: Hexavalent Chromium, Lead, Noise, Silica with a 
special emphasis on training non-English speaking/limited-English-
proficient workers
5. Safety Hazards related to Mechanized, Over-the-Road and Heavy 
Construction Equipment, including but not limited to the following 
subtopic: Compactor Rollovers
6. Work Zone Safety
Training Topics That Address General Industry Hazards
    Programs that train workers and employers in the recognition and 
prevention of safety and health hazards addressing one of the following 
training topic areas.
7. Combustible Dust, including but not limited to the following 
subtopics: Controlling Ignition Sources, Controlling Dust 
Accumulations, Grain Handling Operations
8. Emergency Preparedness and Response, including but not limited to 
the following subtopics: Pandemic Flu and Continuity of Operations
9. Falls in General Industry
10. Materials Handling, including but not limited to the following 
subtopics: Cranes, Hazardous Materials, and Slings
11. Health Hazards in General Industry, including but not limited to 
the following subtopics: Isocyanates, and Metal Working Fluids
12. Landscaping and Tree Service Safety, including but not limited to 
the following subtopic: Hearing Conservation with a special emphasis on 
training non-English speaking/limited-English-proficient workers
13. Night time Sanitation, Maintenance and Cleanup Crews working the 
Third Shift in Food Processing Industries such as red meat, poultry, 
and fish, including but not limited to the following subtopics: 
Lockout/Tagout, Confined Spaces, Carbon Monoxide Hazards
14. Powered Industrial Trucks
15. Process Safety Management, including but not limited to the 
following subtopics: Chemical Plants, Ethanol Plants, Refineries, and 
Anhydrous Ammonia
16. Safety and Health Management Systems for Small and Medium-Sized 
Businesses
Training Topics That Address Other Safety and Health Topic Areas
    Programs that train workers and employers in the recognition and 
prevention of safety and health hazards addressing one of the following 
training topic areas.
17. Alternative Energy Industry Hazards, including but not limited to 
the following subtopics: Biofuels, Elevated Tower Work, Hydrogen 
Production and Distribution, Solar Farming, and Wind Farming
18. Electrical Safety, including but not limited to the following 
subtopics: Arc Flash and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Arc 
Flash, Proper Grounding Techniques, and Electrical Transmission and 
Distribution
19. Ergonomics, including but not limited to the following subtopics: 
Nursing Homes, Poultry Processing, Retail Grocery Stores, Masonry 
Construction, and Solid Waste Removal
20. Heat Stress Exposure, including but not limited to migrant workers
21. Maritime, including but not limited to the following subtopics: 
Maritime Standards, Longshoring, Marine Terminals, Shipbreaking, 
Shipyard Safety Hazards including Electrical Hazards and Arc Flash, 
Ergonomics, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including Flotation 
Devices, and Emergency Procedures
22. Native American Tribal Safety and Health Issues, including but not 
limited to the following subtopics: Confined Space, Bloodborne 
Pathogens, Construction Safety, Health and Safety in Waste Water 
Treatment Facilities, and in the Health Care Industry
23. Oil and Gas, including but not limited to the following subtopics: 
Exploration, Production, and Well Development
24. OSHA Recordkeeping Process. Develop materials and conduct training 
to train workers and employers in the recognition and compliance 
requirements of the Recordkeeping system to accurately record cases and 
respond to injury or illness information appropriately in the following 
sections contained under Part 1904: General Recording Criteria 
(1904.7), Covered Employees (1904.31), Employee Involvement (1904.35), 
and Prohibition Against Discrimination (1904.36)

II. Award Information

    Targeted Topic training grants will be awarded for a 24-month 
project performance period. The 24-month project period for these 
grants begins no later than September 30, 2009. There is approximately 
$6.9 million available for the Targeted Topic grant category in 2009. 
The average Federal award will be approximately $250,000. Historically, 
the Harwood Grant Program has been reauthorized from year to year. The 
Department of Labor expects, but cannot guarantee, that this will be so 
in the future. If Congress appropriates the necessary funds, the 
Department of Labor will award second year grants to eligible 
applicants.

III. Eligibility Information

1. Eligible Applicants

    Nonprofit organizations, including qualifying labor unions and 
community-based and faith-based organizations that are not an agency of 
a State or local government are eligible to apply. Additionally, State 
or local government-supported institutions of higher education are 
eligible to apply in accordance with 29 CFR part 95. Eligible 
organizations can apply independently for funding or in partnership 
with other eligible organizations, but in such a case, the lead 
organization must be identified. Sub-grants are not authorized. 
Subcontracts, if any, must be awarded in accordance with 29 CFR 95.40-
48, including OMB circulars requiring full and open competition for 
procurement transactions, to the maximum extent practicable.
    A 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization, as described in 26 U.S.C. 
501(c)(4), that engages in lobbying activities will not be eligible for 
the receipt of Federal funds constituting an award, grant or loan. See 
1 U.S.C. 1611.
    Applicants other than State or local government supported 
institutions of higher education will be required to submit evidence of 
nonprofit status from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

2. Cost Sharing or Matching

    Applicants are not required to contribute non-Federal resources.

3. Other Eligibility Requirements

    Legal rules pertaining to inherently religious activities by 
organizations that receive Federal financial assistance.
    The U. S. Government is generally prohibited from providing 
"direct" financial assistance for inherently religious activities.\1\
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    \1\ In this context, the term direct financial assistance means 
financial assistance that is provided directly by a government 
entity or an intermediate organization, as opposed to financial 
assistance that an organization receives as the result of the 
genuine and independent private choice of a beneficiary. In other 
contexts, the term "direct" financial assistance may be used to 
refer to financial assistance that an organization receives directly 
from the Federal government (also known as "discretionary" 
assistance), as opposed to assistance that it receives from a State 
or Local government (also known as "indirect" or "block" grant 
assistance). The term "direct" has the former meaning throughout 
this solicitation for grant applications (SGA).
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    The Grantee may be a faith-based organization or work with and 
partner with religious institutions; however, "direct" federal 
assistance provided under grants with the U.S. Department of Labor may 
not be used for religious instruction, worship, prayer, proselytizing 
or other inherently religious practices. 29 CFR Part 2, Subpart D 
governs the treatment in Department of Labor government programs of 
religious organizations and religious activities; the Grantee and sub-
contractors are expected to be aware of and observe the regulations in 
this subpart.

IV. Application and Submission Information

1. Application Package

    All information and forms needed to apply for this funding 
opportunity are published as part of this SGA or are available on the 
Grants.gov site. For informational purposes, the complete Federal 
Register notice is also posted on the OSHA Susan Harwood Training Grant 
Program Web site at: http://www.osha.gov/dte/sharwood/index.html.

2. Content and Form of Application Submission

    Each grant application must address only one of the 24 announced 
training topics. Organizations interested in applying for grants for 
more than one of the announced grant training topics must submit a 
separate application for each grant training topic.
A. Required Contents
    A complete application will contain the following mandatory forms, 
mandatory document attachments and optional attachments.
    (1) Application for Federal Assistance form (SF 424). The 
individual signing the SF 424 form on behalf of the applicant must be 
authorized to bind the applicant.
    Your organization is required to have a Data Universal Number 
System (DUNS) number from Dun and Bradstreet to complete this form. 
Information about "Obtaining a DUNS Number--A Guide for Federal Grant 
and Cooperative Agreement Applicants" is available at: http://
www.whitehouse.gov/omb/grants/duns_num_guide.pdf.
    (2) Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants (Faith-
Based EEO Survey) form OMB No. 1890-0014.
    (3) Program Summary (described further in subsection B below). The 
program summary is a short one-to-two page single-sided abstract that 
succinctly summarizes the proposed project and provides information 
about the applicant organization.
    (4) Budget Information form (SF 424A).
    (5) Detailed Project Budget Backup. The detailed budget backup will 
provide a detailed breakout of the costs that are listed in Section B 
of the SF 424A Budget Information form. If applicable, provide a copy 
of approved indirect cost rate agreement and statement of program 
income. Indirect costs may only be requested if your organization 
already has a current approved indirect cost rate agreement.
    (6) A description of any voluntary non-federal resource 
contribution to be provided by the applicant, including source of funds 
and estimated amount.
    (7) Technical Proposal program narrative (described further in 
subsection B below), not to exceed 30 single-sided pages, double-
spaced, 12-point font, containing: Problem Statement/Need for Funds; 
Administrative and Program Capability; and Work Plan.
    (8) Assurances form (SF 424B).
    (9) Combined Assurances form (ED 80-0013).
    (10) Organizational Chart.
    (11) Evidence of Non-Profit status from the Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS), if applicable. (Does not apply to State and local 
government-supported institutions of higher education.)
    (12) Accounting System Certification, if applicable. Organizations 
that receive less than $1 million annually in Federal grants must 
attach a certification signed by your certifying official stating that 
your organization has a functioning accounting system that meets the 
criteria below. Your organization may also designate a qualified entity 
(include the name and address in the documentation) to maintain a 
functioning accounting system that meets the criteria below. The 
certification should attest that your organization's accounting system 
provides for the following:
    (a) Accurate, current and complete disclosure of the financial 
results of each Federally sponsored project.
    (b) Records that identify adequately the source and application of 
funds for Federally sponsored activities.
    (c) Effective control over and accountability for all funds, 
property and other assets.
    (d) Comparison of outlays with budget amounts.
    (e) Written procedures to minimize the time elapsing between the 
transfer of funds.
    (f) Written procedures for determining the reasonableness, 
allocability and allowability of costs.
    (g) Accounting records, including cost accounting records that are 
supported by source documentation.
    (13) Any attachments such as resumes of key personnel or position 
descriptions, exhibits, information on prior government grants, and 
signed letters of commitment to the project. Please limit the number of 
attachments to essential documents only.
    To be considered responsive to this solicitation, the application 
must consist of the above mentioned separate parts. Major sections and 
sub-sections of the application should be divided and clearly 
identified, and all pages shall be numbered. Standard forms, 
attachments, exhibits and the Program Summary abstract are not counted 
toward the page limit.
    The forms listed above are available through the www.Grants.gov 
site and must be submitted electronically as a part of your grant 
application. In the Grants.gov system, there is a window containing a 
menu of "Mandatory Documents" which must be completed and submitted 
online within the system. For all other attachments such as the Program 
Summary, Detailed Budget Backup, Technical Proposal, etc., please scan 
these documents into a single Adobe Acrobat file and attach the 
document in the area for attachments.
B. Budget Information
    Applicants must include the following required grant project budget 
information.
    (1) Budget Information form (SF 424A).
    (2) A Detailed Project Budget that clearly details the costs of 
performing all of the requirements presented in this solicitation. The 
detailed budget will break out the costs that are listed in Section B 
of the SF 424A Budget Information form. Applicants are asked to plan 
for a funding level based on funds needed to perform work plan and 
administrative activities for the grant project performance period.
    Applicants are reminded to budget for compliance with the 
administrative requirements set forth. (Copies of all regulations that 
are referenced in this solicitation for grant applications (SGA) are 
available on-line at no cost at: http://www.osha.gov/dcsp/ote/
sharwood.html.) This includes the costs of performing activities such 
as travel for two staff members, one program and one financial, to the 
Washington, DC, area to attend a new grantee orientation meeting; 
financial audit, if required; project closeout; document preparation 
(e.g., quarterly progress reports, project documents); and ensuring 
compliance with procurement and property standards.
    The Detailed Project Budget should break out administrative costs 
separately from programmatic costs for both federal and non-federal 
funds. Administrative costs include indirect costs from the costs pool 
and the cost of activities, materials, meeting close-out requirements 
as described in Section VI, and personnel (e.g., administrative 
assistants) who support the management and administration of the 
project but do not provide direct services to project beneficiaries. 
Indirect cost charges, which are considered administrative costs, must 
be supported with a copy of a current approved Indirect Cost Rate 
Agreement form. Administrative costs cannot exceed 25% of the total 
grant budget. The project budget should clearly demonstrate that the 
total amount and distribution of funds are sufficient to cover the cost 
of all major project activities identified by the applicant in its 
proposal, and must comply with Federal cost principles (which can be 
found in the applicable OMB Circulars).
    (3) A description of any voluntary non-federal resource 
contribution to be provided by the applicant, including source of funds 
and estimated amount.
C. Program Summary and Technical Proposal
    The Program Summary and the Technical Proposal will contain the 
narrative segments of the application. The Program Summary abstract is 
not to exceed two single-sided, 12-point font, typed pages. The 
Technical Proposal program narrative section is not to exceed 30 
single-sided (8\1/2\" x 11" or A4), double-spaced, 12-point font, 
typed pages, consisting of the Problem Statement/Need for Funds, 
Administrative and Program Capability, and Work Plan. Reviewers will 
only consider Technical Proposal information up to the 30-page limit. 
The Technical Proposal must demonstrate the capability to successfully 
administer the grant and to meet the objectives of this solicitation. 
The Technical Proposal will be rated in accordance with the selection 
criteria specified in Section V.
    The Program Summary and Technical Proposal must include the 
following sections.
    (1) Program Summary. An abstract of the application, not to exceed 
two single-sided pages, that must include the following information.
     Applicant organization's full legal name.
     Project Director's name, title, street address for 
overnight delivery service, and mailing address if it is different from 
the street address, telephone and fax numbers, and e-mail address. The 
Project Director is the person who will be responsible for the day-to-
day operation and administration of the program. The Project Director's 
name should also be the same name you list on the Application for 
Federal Assistance form (SF-424) in section f. Name and contact 
information of person to be contacted on matters involving this 
application.
     Authorized Representative/Certifying Representative's 
name, title, street address for overnight delivery service, and mailing 
address if it is different from the street address, telephone and fax 
numbers, and e-mail address. The Authorized Representative/Certifying 
Representative is the official in your organization who is authorized 
to enter into grant agreements. The Authorized Representative/
Certifying Representative's name should also be same name you list on 
the Application for Federal Assistance form (SF-424) in section 21 for 
Authorized Representative.
     If someone other than the Authorized Representative/
Certifying Representative described above will be authorized by your 
organization to submit and sign off on quarterly financial reports (SF 
269 forms) for OSHA, provide their name, title, street address for 
overnight delivery service, and mailing address if it is different from 
the street address, telephone and fax numbers, and e-mail address.
     Funding Amount. List the amount of Federal funding you are 
requesting to perform work plan and administrative activities for the 
grant project performance period. If your organization is contributing 
non-Federal resources, also list the amount of non-Federal resources 
and the source of those funds.
     Grant Topic. List the one grant training topic and 
industry your organization has selected to target in its application.
     Summary of the Proposed Project. Write a brief program 
summary of your proposed grant project.
     Applicant Background. Describe your applicant 
organization, including its mission, identify the type of non-profit 
organization it is, and provide a description of your membership, if 
any. Your description should indicate how many full-time and part-time 
employees your organization employs.
    (2) The Technical Proposal program narrative segment, which is not 
to exceed 30 single-sided, double-spaced, 12-point font pages in 
length, must address each section listed below.
     Problem Statement/Need for Funds. Describe the hazards 
that will be addressed in your program, the target population(s) that 
will benefit from your training and educational program, and the 
barriers that have prevented this population from receiving adequate 
training. When you discuss target populations, include geographic 
location(s) to be served, and the number of workers and employers to be 
reached.
     Administrative and Program Capability. Briefly describe 
your organization's functions and activities. Relate this description 
of functions to your organizational chart that you will include in the 
application. If your organization is conducting, or has conducted 
within the last five years, any other government (Federal, State, or 
local) grant programs, the application must include an attachment 
(which will not count towards the page limit) providing information 
regarding previous grants including a) the organization for which the 
work was done, and b) the dollar value of the grant. If your 
organization has not had previous grant experience, you may partner 
with an organization that has grant experience to manage the grant. If 
you use this approach, the management organization must be identified 
and its grant program experience discussed.
     Program Experience. Describe your organization's 
experience conducting the type of program that you are proposing. 
Include program specifics such as program titles, numbers trained and 
duration of training. Experience includes safety and health experience, 
training experience with adults, and programs operated specifically for 
the selected target population(s). Nonprofit organizations, including 
community-based and faith-based organizations, that do not have prior 
experience in safety and health may partner with an established safety 
and health organization to acquire safety and health expertise.
     Staff Experience. Describe the qualifications of the 
professional staff you will assign to the program. Include resumes of 
staff already on board. If some positions are vacant, include position 
descriptions/minimum hiring qualifications instead of resumes. Qualified 
staff is generally defined as persons with safety and health experience 
and a) training experience with adults or b) experience working with the 
target population.
     Work Plan. Develop a 24-month work plan that is broken out 
by calendar year quarters. An outline of specific items required in 
your work plan follows.
     Each educational institution that receives Federal funds 
for a fiscal year shall hold an educational program on the United 
States Constitution on September 17 of such year for the students 
served by the educational institution. Per Section 111 of Division J of 
Public Law 108-447, the "Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2005," 
December 8, 2004; 118 Stat. 2809, 3344-45, requires "educational 
institutions" that receive Federal funds to hold an educational 
program on the United States Constitution on September 17 
("Constitution Day and Citizenship Day") of each year. The Office of 
Personnel Management has placed relevant materials on its Web site at 
the following address: http://opm.gov/constitution_initiative. Also, 
the U.S. Department of Education's Federal Register Notice of the 
Implementation of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day on September 17 
of Each Year, published on May 24, 2005, can be found at: http://
edocket.access.gpo.gov/2005/05-10355.htm. Please note that this site 
primarily addresses educational institutions that receive funds from 
the U.S. Department of Education. However, it also discusses other 
materials that may be helpful to your organization.
     Work Plan Overview. Describe your plan for grant 
activities and the anticipated outcomes. The overall plan will describe 
such things as the development of training materials or the plan to use 
existing training materials, the training content, recruiting of 
trainees, where or how training will take place, and the anticipated 
benefits to workers and employers receiving the training.
     Work Plan Activities. Break your overall plan down into 
activities or tasks. For each activity, explain what will be done, who 
will do it, when it will be done, and the results of the activity. When 
you discuss training, include the subjects to be taught, the length of 
the training sessions, and training location (classroom, worksites). 
Describe how you will recruit trainees for the training. If your 
organization is an educational institution, also describe the 
educational activities your organization will conduct on Constitution 
Day, September 17.
     Work Plan Quarterly Projections. For training and other 
quantifiable activities, estimate how many (e.g., number of advisory 
committee meetings, classes to be conducted, workers and employers to 
be trained, etc.) you will accomplish each quarter of the grant (grant 
quarters match calendar quarters, i.e., January to March, April to 
June) and provide the training number totals for the grant. 
Substantiate the methodology used to develop your projections. Grantees 
are accountable for accomplishing the activities listed in their work 
plans and meeting quarterly projections. Quarterly projections are used 
to measure your actual performance against your plans. If you plan to 
conduct a train-the-trainer program, estimate the number of individuals 
you expect to be trained during the grant period by those who received 
the train-the-trainer training. These second tier training numbers 
should only be included if your organization is planning to formally 
follow up with the trainers to obtain this data during the grant 
project performance period.
     Materials. Describe each training material you will 
produce under the grant, if not treated as a separate activity under 
Activities above. Provide a timetable for developing and producing the 
material. OSHA must review and approve training materials for technical 
accuracy and suitability of content before the materials may be used in 
your grant program. Therefore, your timetable must include provisions 
for an OSHA review of draft and camera-ready products. Acceptable 
formats for training materials include Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007 
and Adobe Reader version 9.0, 8.1.3 and 8.1.2. Any previously developed 
training materials you are proposing to utilize in your grant training 
must also go through an OSHA review before being used.
     Evaluations. There are three types of evaluations that 
should be conducted. First, describe plans to evaluate the training 
sessions. Second, describe your plans to evaluate your progress in 
accomplishing the grant work activities listed in your application. 
This includes comparing planned vs. actual accomplishments. Discuss who 
is responsible for taking corrective action if plans are not being met. 
Third, describe your plans to assess the effectiveness of the training 
your organization is conducting. This will involve following-up, by 
survey or on-site review, if feasible, with individuals who attended 
the training to find out what changes were made to abate hazards in 
their workplaces. Include timetables for follow-up and for submitting a 
summary of the assessment results to OSHA.
    (3) An organizational chart of the staff that will be working on 
this grant and their location within the applicant organization.
    Attachments: Summaries of other relevant organizational 
experiences; information on prior government grants; 
résumés of key personnel and/or position descriptions; 
and signed letters of commitment to the project. Please limit the 
number of attachments to essential documents only.
    Acceptable formats for document attachments submitted as a part of 
a Grants.gov grant application include Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007 
and Adobe Reader version 9.0, 8.1.3 and 8.1.2.

3. Submission Date, Times, and Addresses

    Date: The deadline date for receipt of applications is Friday, July 
24, 2009. Applications must be received by 4:30 p.m., E.T., on the 
closing date at:  http://www.grants.gov. Any application received after 
the deadline will not be accepted.
    Electronic Submission of Applications: Applications for Susan 
Harwood grants under this competition must be submitted electronically 
using the government-wide Grants.gov Apply site at: http://
www.grants.gov. Through this site you will be able to download a copy 
of the application package, complete it offline, and then upload and 
submit your full application. Acceptable formats for document 
attachments submitted as a part of a Grants.gov grant application 
include Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007 and Adobe Reader version 9.0, 
8.1.3 and 8.1.2. In the Grants.gov system, there is a window containing 
a menu of "Mandatory Documents" which must be completed and submitted 
online within the system. For all other attachments such as the Program 
Summary, Detailed Budget Backup, Technical Proposal, etc., please scan 
these documents into a single Adobe Acrobat file and attach the 
document in the area for attachments. Applications sent by mail or 
other delivery services, e-mail, telegram, or facsimile (FAX) will not 
be accepted. Applications that do not meet the conditions set forth in 
this notice will not be honored.
    For applicants using Grants.gov for the first time, it is strongly 
recommended that they immediately initiate and complete the "Get Registered" steps to register with 
Grants.gov at: http://www.grants.gov/applicants/get_registered.jsp. 
These steps will probably take multiple days to complete, which should 
be factored into an applicant's plans for electronic application 
submission in order to avoid unexpected delays that could result in the 
rejection of the application.
    If your organization is already registered with Grants.gov and 
there have been any changes to your organization users, such as the E-
Business Point of Contact or Authorized Organization Representatives, 
please be sure that the necessary updates are made with Grants.gov to 
prevent delay in submission of the electronic application. Please note 
that registered organizations must also renew their Central Contractor 
Registration (CCR) registration once a year. This process takes five 
days to complete, so it should be factored into an applicant's plans 
for electronic application submission in order to avoid unexpected 
delays that could result in the rejection of the application.
    If you have questions regarding the process for updating your 
organization users or submitting your application through Grants.gov, 
or are experiencing problems with electronic submissions, you may 
contact the Grants Program Management Office via one of the methods 
below:
     E-mail at: support@grants.gov.
     Telephone the Grants.gov Contact Center Phone: 1-800-518-
4726. The Contact Center hours of operation are Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. 
to 9 p.m., Eastern Time; closed on Federal holidays.
     When contacting the Grants Program Management Office, the 
following information will help expedite your inquiry.
    • Funding Opportunity Number (FON).
    • Name of Agency You Are Applying To.
    • Specific Area of Concern.
    If applying online poses a hardship to any applicant, the OSHA 
Directorate of Training and Education will provide assistance to ensure 
that applications are submitted online by the closing date. Applicants 
must contact the OSHA Directorate of Training and Education office 
listed on the announcement at least one week prior to the application 
deadline date (or not later than 4:30 p.m., E.T., on July 17, 2009) to 
speak to a representative who can provide assistance to ensure that 
applications are submitted online by the closing date. Requests for 
extensions to this application deadline will not be granted.

4. Intergovernmental Review

    The Harwood Training Grant Program is not subject to Executive 
Order 12372 Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs.

5. Funding Restrictions

    Grant funds may be spent on the following.
    (a) Conducting training.
    (b) Conducting other activities that reach and inform workers and 
employers about workplace occupational safety and health hazards and 
hazard abatement.
    (c) Conducting outreach and recruiting activities to increase the 
number of workers and employers participating in the program.
    (d) Developing and/or purchasing training materials for use in 
training.
    Grant funds may not be used for the following activities under the 
terms of the grant program.
    (a) Any activity that is inconsistent with the goals and objectives 
of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.
    (b) Training individuals not covered by the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act.
    (c) Training workers or employers from workplaces not covered by 
the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Examples include: State and 
local government employees in non-State Plan States, and employees 
referenced in section 4 (b)(1) of the Act.
    (d) Training on topics that do not cover the recognition, 
avoidance, and prevention of unsafe or unhealthy working conditions. 
Examples of unallowable topics include: workers' compensation, first 
aid, and publication of materials prejudicial to labor or management.
    (e) Assisting workers in arbitration cases or other actions against 
employers, or assisting employers and workers in the prosecution of 
claims against Federal, State or local governments.
    (f) Duplicating services offered by OSHA, a State under an OSHA-
approved State Plan, or consultation programs provided by State 
designated agencies under section 21(d) of the Occupational Safety and 
Health Act.
    Grant applicants cannot propose to conduct 10-hour and 30-hour OSHA 
Construction Outreach Program courses or 10-hour and 30-hour OSHA 
General Industry Outreach courses as a part of their grant activities. 
Applicants also cannot propose to conduct the courses presented by the 
OSHA Training Institute or its OSHA Training Institute Education 
Centers.
    (g) Generating membership in the grantee's organization. This 
includes activities to acquaint nonmembers with the benefits of 
membership, inclusion of membership appeals in materials produced with 
grant funds, and membership drives.
    (h) The cost of lost-time wages paid by you or other organizations 
to students while attending grant-funded training.
    (i) Administrative costs cannot exceed 25% of the total grant 
budget.
    While the activities described above may be part of an 
organization's regular programs, the costs of these activities cannot 
be paid for by grant funds, whether the funds are from non-Federal 
matching resources or from the Federally funded portion of the grant.
    Determinations of allowable costs will be made in accordance with 
the applicable Federal cost principles, e.g., Nonprofit Organizations--
2 CFR Part 230, formerly OMB Circular A-122; Educational Institutions--
2 CFR Part 220, formerly OMB Circular A-21. Disallowed costs are those 
charges to a grant that the grantor agency or its representative 
determines to not be allowed in accordance with the applicable Federal 
cost principles or other conditions contained in the grant.
    No applicant at any time will be entitled to reimbursement of pre-
award costs.

V. Application Review Information

    Grant applications will be reviewed by technical panels comprised 
of OSHA staff. The results of the grant reviews will be presented to 
the Assistant Secretary of OSHA, who will make the selection of 
organizations to be awarded grants. OSHA may award grants for some or 
all of the listed topic areas. It is anticipated that the grant awards 
will be announced no later than September 2009.

1. Evaluation Criteria

    The technical panels will review grant applications against the 
criteria listed below on the basis of 100 maximum points. Targeted 
Topic training grant category applications will be reviewed and rated 
as follows.
A. Technical Approach, Program Design--50 points total
    Program Design
    (1) The proposed training and educational program must address the 
recognition and prevention of safety and health hazards for one of the 
Targeted Topic subject areas identified in Section I of this SGA. (1 
point)
    (2) The proposal plans to train workers and/or employers, clearly
estimates the numbers to be trained, and clearly identifies the types 
of workers and employers to be trained. The training will reach workers 
and employers from multiple employers who are covered by the OSH Act. 
Substantiate the methodology used to develop your projections. Grantees 
are accountable for accomplishing the activities listed in their work 
plans and meeting quarterly projections. (4 points)
    (3) If the proposal contains a train-the-trainer program, the 
following information must be provided. (4 points)
     What ongoing support the grantee will provide to new 
trainers;
     The number of individuals to be trained as trainers during 
the grant period;
     The estimated number of courses to be conducted by the new 
trainers during the grant period;
     The estimated number of students to be trained by these 
new trainers during the grant period; and
     A description of how the grantee will obtain data via a 
reporting system from the new trainers to document their classes and 
student numbers.
    (4) There is a well-developed work plan, and activities and 
training are adequately described. The planned activities and training 
are appropriately tailored to the needs and levels of the workers and 
employers to be trained. The target audience to be served through the 
grant program is described. (20 points)
    (5) The training materials and training programs are tailored to 
the training needs of one or more of the following target audiences; 
and the need for training is established: small businesses; new 
businesses; non-English speaking/limited English proficient, non-
literate and low literacy workers; youth; immigrant and minority 
workers, and other hard-to-reach workers; and workers in high-hazard 
industries and industries with high fatality rates.
    Grant proposals which include training programs and training 
materials for hard-to-reach and non-English speaking/limited English 
proficient workers will receive special consideration.
    Organizations proposing to develop Spanish-language training 
materials must utilize the OSHA Dictionaries (English-to-Spanish and 
Spanish-to-English) for terminology. The dictionaries are available on 
the OSHA Web site at: http://www.osha.gov/dcsp/compliance_assistance/
spanish_dictionaries.html. Organizations proposing to develop 
materials in languages other than English will also be required to 
provide an English version of the materials. (10 points)
    (6) There is a sound plan to recruit trainees for the program. (4 
points)
    (7) If the proposal includes developing training materials for use 
in the training program, there is a plan for OSHA to review the 
training materials for technical accuracy and suitability of content 
during development. If previously-developed training products will be 
used for the Targeted Topic training program, applicants have a plan 
for OSHA to review the materials before using the products in their 
grant program. (1 point)
    (8) There are plans for three different types of evaluation. The 
plans include evaluating your organization's progress in accomplishing 
the grant work activities and accomplishments, evaluating your training 
sessions, and evaluating the program's effectiveness and impact to 
determine if the safety and health training and services provided 
resulted in workplace change. This includes a description of the 
evaluation plan to follow up with trainees to determine the impact the 
program has had in abating hazards and reducing worker injuries. (5 
points)
    (9) The application is complete, including forms, budget detail, 
narrative and work plan, and required attachments. (1 point)
B. Budget--20 points total
    (1) The budgeted costs are reasonable. No more than 25% of the 
total budget is for administration. (12 points)
    (2) The budget complies with federal cost principles (which can be 
found in the applicable OMB Circulars) and with OSHA budget 
requirements contained in the grant application instructions. (3 
points)
    (3) The cost per trainee is less than $500 and the cost per 
training hour is reasonable. (5 points)
C. Experience of Organization--15 points total
    (1) The organization applying for the grant demonstrates experience 
with occupational safety and health. Applicants that do not have prior 
experience in providing safety and health training to workers or 
employers may partner with an established safety and health 
organization to acquire safety and health expertise. (4 points)
    (2) The organization applying for the grant demonstrates experience 
training adults in work-related subjects or in recruiting, training and 
working with the target audience for this grant. (4 points)
    (3) The application organization demonstrates that the applicant 
has strong financial management and internal control systems. (4 
points)
    (4) The applicant organization has administered, or will work with 
an organization that has administered, a number of different Federal 
and/or State grants over the past five years. (3 points)
D. Experience and Qualification of Personnel--15 points total
    (1) The staff to be assigned to the project has experience in 
occupational safety and health, the specific topic chosen, and in 
training adults. (10 points)
    (2) Project staff has experience in recruiting, training, and 
working with the target population your organization proposes to serve 
under the grant. (5 points)
2. Review and Selection Process
    OSHA will screen all applications to determine whether all required 
proposal elements are present and clearly identifiable. Incomplete 
applications may be deemed non-responsive and may not be evaluated. A 
technical panel will objectively rate each complete application against 
the criteria described in this announcement. The panel recommendations 
to the Assistant Secretary are advisory in nature. The Assistant 
Secretary may establish a minimally acceptable rating range for the 
purpose of selecting qualified applicants. The Assistant Secretary will 
make a final selection determination based on what is most advantageous 
to the government, considering factors such as panel findings, 
geographic presence of the applicants, Agency priorities, the best 
value to the government, cost, and other factors. The Assistant 
Secretary's determination for award under this solicitation for grant 
applications (SGA) is final.
3. Anticipated Announcement and Award Dates
    Announcement of these awards is expected to occur no later than 
September 30, 2009.
    The grant agreements will be awarded by no later than September 
2009.

VI. Award Administration Information

1. Award Process

    Organizations selected as grant recipients will be notified by a 
representative of the Assistant Secretary. An applicant whose proposal 
is not selected will be notified in writing.
    Notice that an organization has been selected as a grant recipient 
does not constitute approval of the grant application as submitted. 
Before the actual grant award, OSHA will enter into negotiations concerning 
such items as program components, staffing and funding levels, and 
administrative systems. If the negotiations do not result in an acceptable 
submittal, the Assistant Secretary reserves the right to terminate the 
negotiation and decline to fund the proposal.

    Note: Except as specifically provided, OSHA's acceptance of a 
proposal and an award of Federal funds to sponsor any program(s) 
does not provide a waiver of any grant requirement or procedures. 
For example, if an application identifies a specific sub-contractor 
to provide services, the USDOL OSHA award does not provide the 
justification or basis to sole-source the procurement, i.e., to 
avoid competition.

2. Administrative and National Policy Requirements

    All grantees, including faith-based organizations, will be subject 
to applicable federal laws and regulations (including provisions of 
appropriations law) and the applicable Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) Circulars. The grant award(s) awarded under this SGA will be 
subject to the following administrative standards and provisions, as 
applicable to the particular grantee:
    29 CFR Part 2, Subpart D, new equal treatment regulations.
    29 CFR Parts 31, 32, 35 and 36 as applicable.
    29 CFR Part 93, new restrictions on lobbying.
    29 CFR Part 95, which covers grant requirements for nonprofit 
organizations, including universities and hospitals. These are the 
Department of Labor regulations implementing 2 CFR Part 215, formerly 
OMB Circular A-110.
    29 CFR Part 98, government-wide debarment and suspension 
(nonprocurement) and government-wide requirements for drug-free 
workplace (grants).
    2 CFR Part 220, formerly OMB Circular A-21, which describes 
allowable and unallowable costs for educational institutions.
    2 CFR Part 230, formerly OMB circular A-122, which describes 
allowable and unallowable costs for other nonprofit organizations.
    OMB Circular A-133, 29 CFR parts 96 and 99, which provide 
information about audit requirements.
    Certifications. All applicants are required to certify to a drug-
free workplace in accordance with 29 CFR part 98, to comply with the 
New Restrictions on Lobbying published at 29 CFR part 93, to make a 
certification regarding the debarment rules at 29 CFR part 98, and to 
complete a special lobbying certification.
    Training Audience. Grant-funded training programs must serve 
multiple employers and their workers. Grant-funded training programs 
must serve individuals covered by the Occupational Safety and Health 
Act of 1970. Grant-funded training and services cannot serve employees 
of other federal agencies or OSHA employees. As a part of the grant 
close-out process, grantees must self-certify that their grant-funded 
programs and materials were not provided to ineligible audiences.
    Other. In keeping with the policies outlined in Executive Orders 
13256, 12928, 13230, and 13021 as amended, the grantee is strongly 
encouraged to provide subcontracting opportunities to Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, and 
Tribal Colleges and Universities.
    Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). Submission of the grant 
application information is required in order for the applicant to be 
considered for a grant award. Information submitted in the respondent's 
application is not considered confidential. Awarded grant application 
packages are releasable under the Freedom of Information Act. However, 
information protected from disclosure under the Privacy Act will be 
withheld.

3. Special Program Requirements

    OSHA review of training materials. OSHA will review all educational 
materials produced by the grantee for technical accuracy and 
suitability of content during development and before final publication. 
OSHA will also review previously-developed training curricula and 
purchased training materials for technical accuracy and suitability of 
content before the materials are used. Grantees developing training 
materials must follow all copyright laws and provide written 
certification that their materials are free from copyright 
infringements.
    When grant recipients produce training materials, they must provide 
copies of completed final-product materials to OSHA before the end of 
the grant period. OSHA has a lending program that circulates grant-
produced audiovisual materials. Audiovisual materials produced by the 
grantee as a part of its grant program may be included in this lending 
program. In addition, all materials produced by grantees must be 
provided to OSHA in hard copy as well as in a digital format (CD Rom/
DVD) for possible publication on the Internet by OSHA. Two copies of 
the materials must be provided to OSHA. Acceptable formats for training 
materials include Microsoft Office 2003 or 2007 and Adobe Reader 
version 9.0, 8.1.3 and 8.1.2.
    As stated in 29 CFR 95.36, the Department of Labor reserves a 
royalty-free, nonexclusive and irrevocable right to reproduce, publish, 
or otherwise use for federal purposes any work produced under a grant, 
and to authorize others to do so. Applicants should note that grantees 
must agree to provide the Department of Labor a paid-up, nonexclusive 
and irrevocable license to reproduce, publish, or otherwise use for 
federal purposes all products developed, or for which ownership was 
purchased, under an award including, but not limited to, curricula, 
training models, technical assistance products, and any related 
materials, and to authorize the Department of Labor to do so. Such uses 
include, but are not limited to, the right to modify and distribute 
such products worldwide by any means, electronic or otherwise.
    Acknowledgment of USDOL Funding. In all circumstances, all approved 
grant-funded materials developed by a grantee shall contain the 
following disclaimer:
    This material was produced under grant number -------- from the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of 
Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the 
U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial 
products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
    Public reference to grant: When issuing statements, press releases, 
requests for proposals, bid solicitations, and other documents 
describing projects or programs funded in whole or in part with federal 
money, all grantees receiving federal funds must clearly state:
     The percentage of the total costs of the program or 
project that will be financed with federal money;
     The dollar amount of federal financial assistance for the 
project or program; and
     The percentage and dollar amount of the total costs of the 
project or program that will be financed by non-governmental sources.
    Use of U.S. Department of Labor (USDOL) OSHA Logo: The USDOL-OSHA 
logo may not be applied to any grant products developed with grant 
funds.

4. Reporting

    Grantees are required by Departmental regulations to submit program 
and financial reports each calendar quarter. All reports are due no later 
than 30 days after the end of the fiscal quarter. Program reports shall 
be submitted to the appropriate OSHA Regional Office. Financial reports 
shall be submitted via the DOL E-Grants system. The Grantee(s) shall submit 
financial reports on a quarterly basis. The first reporting period shall 
end on the last day of the fiscal quarter (December 31, March 31, June 30, 
or September 30) during which the grant was signed. Financial reports are 
due within 30 days of the end of the reporting period (i.e., by January 
30, April 30, July 30, and October 30).
    The Grantee(s) shall use Standard Form (SF) 269, Financial Status 
Report, to report the status of funds, at the project level, during the 
grant period. A final SF269 shall be submitted no later than 90 days 
following completion of the grant period. The SF269 reports will be 
submitted electronically through the Department of Labor (DOL) E-Grants 
system. It is expected that the Federal Financial Report (FFR) will 
replace the SF269 by October 1, 2009, as mandated by the Office of 
Management and Budget. When available, the FFR will replace the SF269 
in DOL E-Grants. The quarterly and final reporting requirements will 
not change.
    Technical Progress Reports: After signing the agreement, the 
Grantee(s) shall submit technical progress reports to USDOL/OSHA 
Regional Offices at the end of each fiscal quarter. Technical progress 
reports provide both quantitative and qualitative information and a 
narrative assessment of performance for the preceding three-month 
period. OSHA Form 171 shall be used for reporting training numbers. In 
addition, a narrative report shall be provided that details grant 
activities conducted during the quarter, provides an assessment of how 
the project is progressing in achieving its stated objectives, and 
notes any problems or delays along with corrective actions proposed. 
The first reporting period shall end on the last day of the fiscal 
quarter (December 31, March 31, June 30, or September 30) during which 
the grant was signed. Quarterly progress reports are due within 30 days 
of the end of the report period (i.e., by January 30, April 30, July 
30, and October 30.) Between reporting dates, the Grantees(s) shall 
also immediately inform USDOL/OSHA of significant developments and/or 
problems affecting the organization's ability to accomplish planned 
grant activities.

    Authority:  The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, (29 
U.S.C. 670), Public Law 111-8, and the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 
2009.

    Signed at Washington, DC, this 4th day of June, 2009.
Jordan Barab,
Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health.

Application Document Checklist

Application for Federal Assistance (SF 424 form)
Budget Information (SF 424A form)
Assurances (SF 424B form)
Combined Assurances for (ED 80-0013 form)
Survey on Ensuring Equal Opportunity for Applicants (Faith-Based EEO 
Survey), (OMB No. 1890-0014 form)
Attachments (Please attach in the following order):
Program Summary (not to exceed two single-sided pages)
Detailed Project Budget Backup
    If applicable: provide a copy of approved indirect cost rate 
agreement, statement of program income, and a description of any 
voluntary non-federal resource contribution to be provided by the 
applicant, including source of funds and estimated amount.
    Technical Proposal, program narrative, not to exceed 30 single-
sided pages, double-spaced, 12-point font, containing: Problem 
Statement/Need for Funds; Administrative and Program Capability; and 
Work plan.
    Organizational Chart Evidence of Nonprofit status, (letter from the 
IRS), if applicable Accounting System Certification, if applicable; 
Other Attachments such as: Resumes of key personnel or position 
descriptions, exhibits, information on prior government grants, and 
signed letters of commitment to the project.

    Note:  In the Grants.gov system, there is a window containing a 
menu of "Mandatory Documents" which must be completed and 
submitted online within the system. For all other attachments such 
as the Program Summary, Detailed Budget Backup, Technical Proposal, 
etc., please scan these documents into a single Adobe Acrobat file 
and attach the document in the area for attachments.

[FR Doc. E9-13516 Filed 6-9-09; 8:45 am]


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