Federal Registers - Table of Contents Federal Registers - Table of Contents
• Publication Date: 11/10/2009
• Publication Type: Final Rules
• Fed Register #: 74:57883-57884
• Standard Number: 1910; 1910.102; 1910.102(a); 1910.253
• Title: Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

[Federal Register: November 10, 2009 (Volume 74, Number 216)]
[Rules and Regulations]               
[Page 57883-57884]
From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov]
[DOCID:fr10no09-1]                         

========================================================================
Rules and Regulations
                                                Federal Register
________________________________________________________________________

This section of the FEDERAL REGISTER contains regulatory documents 
having general applicability and legal effect, most of which are keyed 
to and codified in the Code of Federal Regulations, which is published 
under 50 titles pursuant to 44 U.S.C. 1510.

The Code of Federal Regulations is sold by the Superintendent of Documents. 
Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each 
week.

========================================================================

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

20 CFR Part 1910

[Docket No. OSHA-2008-0034]
RIN 1218-AC08

 
Revising Standards Referenced in the Acetylene Standard

AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), 
Department of Labor.

ACTION: Final rule; confirmation of effective date.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SUMMARY: OSHA is confirming the effective date of its direct final rule 
that revises the Acetylene Standard for general industry by updating 
references to standards published by standards-developing 
organizations. The direct final rule stated that it would become 
effective on November 9, 2009, unless OSHA received no significant 
adverse comments on the direct final rule by September 10, 2009. OSHA 
received eight comments on the direct final rule by that date, which it 
determined were not significant adverse comments. Therefore, OSHA is 
confirming that the direct final rule became effective on November 9, 
2009.

DATES: The direct final rule published on August 11, 2009, is effective 
on November 9, 2009. For the purposes of judicial review, OSHA 
considers November 9, 2009 as the date of issuance.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: 
    General information and press inquiries: Contact Jennifer Ashley, 
Director, OSHA Office of Communications, Room N-3647, U.S. Department 
of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20210; 
telephone: (202) 693-1999.
    Technical information: Contact Ted Twardowski, Directorate of 
Standards and Guidance, Room N-3609, OSHA, U.S. Department of Labor, 
200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 20210; telephone: (202) 
693-2070; fax: (202) 693-1663.
    Copies of this Federal Register notice. Electronic copies of this 
Federal Register notice are available at http://www.regulations.gov. 
This Federal Register notice, as well as news releases and other 
relevant information, are also available at OSHA's Web page at http://
www.osha.gov.

ADDRESSES: In compliance with 28 U.S.C. 2112(a), OSHA designates the 
Associate Solicitor of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health as the 
recipient of petitions for review of the final standard. Contact the 
Associate Solicitor at the Office of the Solicitor, Room S-4004, U.S. 
Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, NW., Washington, DC 
20210; telephone: (202) 693-5445.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: On August 11, 2009, OSHA published the 
direct final rule in the Federal Register that revised the Acetylene 
Standard for general industry by updating references to standards 
published by standards-developing organizations (see 74 FR 40442). In 
that Federal Register document OSHA also stated that it would confirm 
the effective date of the direct final rule, if it received no 
significant adverse comments on the direct final rule.
    OSHA received eight comments on the direct final rule, which it 
determined were not significant adverse comments. Several of these 
commenters observed that the Compressed Gas Association updated the CGA 
G-1 standard this year, and recommended that OSHA adopt this new 
edition (Exs. OSHA-2008-0034-0017, -0010, and -0022). OSHA did not 
include the 2009 edition of CGA G-1 in the direct final rule because 
that edition was not made available to OSHA prior to publication of the 
direct final rule, and, therefore, was beyond the scope of this 
rulemaking. In its comments, the Compressed Gas Association noted that 
the only difference between the 2003 edition referenced in the direct 
final rule and the recently issued 2009 edition is the addition of one 
sentence to a note in section 5.2 of the 2009 edition, which reads, 
"Additionally, single cylinders of acetylene and oxygen located at a 
work station (e.g., chained to a wall or building column or secured to 
a cart) shall be considered 'in service' " (see Ex. OSHA-2008-0034-
0020). Nevertheless, OSHA plans to update the reference to CGA G-1 in a 
future rulemaking as resources and priorities permit.
    Another commenter complained of the economic burden imposed by the 
flow-rate provision of the 2003 edition of CGA G-1 (Ex. OSHA-2008-0034-
0021). In this regard, the 1966 edition of the standard (the edition 
cited previously in 29 CFR 1910.102(a)) specified a flow rate of one-
seventh of the capacity of the cylinder per hour regardless of the 
duration of use, while the 2003 edition reduced this flow rate to one-
tenth of the cylinder capacity per hour during intermittent use, and 
one-fifteenth of the cylinder capacity per hour during continuous use. 
This commenter stated, "As long as this flow rate [in the 2003 
edition] remains advisory * * * this is not a problem." In the first 
footnote in the preamble of the direct final rule, OSHA noted that 
"both of these flow-rate provisions [in either the 1966 or 2003 
editions] are advisory, not mandatory." Therefore, employers may use 
any flow rate that provides employees with an appropriate level of 
safety.
    Two commenters appeared to confuse the Acetylene Standard at 29 CFR 
1910.102, which was the subject of this rulemaking, with OSHA's 
standard regulating oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting at 29 CFR 
1910.253 (Exs. OSHA-2008-0034-0002 and -0018). The first commenter 
asked, "[W]hat are the dimension[s] of a wall that would separate 
oxygen and acetylene tanks for storage in a[n industrial] shop." The 
second commenter noted that a provision in the 2003 edition of CGA G-1 
requires that a regulator and flow restrictor be attached to an 
acetylene cylinder before opening the cylinder valve, and asserted that 
this provision contradicted other OSHA standards requiring that a 
cylinder valve be "cracked" before attaching a regulator to it. These 
comments address requirements for the use of acetylene in welding 
operations, which is regulated for general industry under 29 CFR 
1910.253, and not the requirements for the generation and distribution 
of acetylene, which is regulated for general industry under 29 CFR 1910.102. 
Accordingly, practices and conditions that apply to acetylene stored in 
cylinders and used in welding operations may differ from the practices 
and conditions appropriate to bulk storage of acetylene in generation 
and distribution facilities.
    One commenter expressed concern that OSHA would apply retroactively 
to existing acetylene-generating facilities that were compliant with 
the appropriate standards when originally constructed, those sections 
of the NFPA 51A-2001 standard that address site location, design, and 
materials (Ex. OSHA-2008-0034-0019). The commenter noted that applying 
the updated NFPA standard in this fashion would require moving or 
demolishing the facilities, or discontinuing operations. In response to 
this commenter, OSHA notes that section 1.2.2 of NFPA 51A-2001 states, 
"An existing plant that is not in strict compliance with the 
provisions of this standard shall be permitted to continue operations 
where such use does not constitute a distinct hazard to life or 
adjoining property." This provision indicates clearly that NFPA 51A-
2001 does not apply to acetylene plants in existence prior to 
publication of the standard when the operations in these plants do not 
endanger employees. Therefore, OSHA considers acetylene plants in 
existence prior to the effective date of NFPA 51A-2001 (i.e., February 
9, 2001) to be in compliance with that standard when the acetylene 
operations in these plants do not "constitute a distinct hazard" to 
employees.

List of Subjects in 29 CFR Part 1910

    Acetylene, General industry, Occupational safety and health, 
Safety.

Authority and Signature

    Jordan Barab, Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational 
Safety and Health, U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue, 
NW., Washington, DC 20210, directed the preparation of this final rule. 
OSHA is issuing this final rule pursuant to Sections 4, 6, and 8 of the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 653, 655, and 
657), 5 U.S.C. 553, Secretary of Labor's Order 5-2007 (72 FR 31160), 
and 29 CFR part 1911.

    Signed at Washington, DC, on November 5, 2009.
Jordan Barab,
Acting Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health.
[FR Doc. E9-27004 Filed 11-9-09; 8:45 am]

BILLING CODE 4510-26-P

Federal Registers - Table of Contents Federal Registers - Table of Contents