Federal Registers - Table of Contents Federal Registers - Table of Contents
• Publication Date: 12/13/1994
• Publication Type: Notice
• Fed Register #: 59:64213-64218
• Standard Number: 1904; 1910; 1926; 1960
• Title: OSHA Training Institute Education Centers

DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OSHA Training Institute Education Centers

AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor.

ACTION: Request for proposals.

SUMMARY: The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) conducts short-term technical training in occupational safety and health through the OSHA Training Institute in Des Plaines, Illinois. In recent years, the number of private sector personnel and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA requesting training has increased beyond the capacity of the OSHA Training Institute to meet the demand. In October 1992, OSHA began a project to test the feasibility of using other training or educational institutions to conduct OSHA Training Institute courses for private sector personnel and for Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA. Based on the success to date of this project, OSHA is expanding the program.

This notice announces the opportunity for interested organizations to submit applications to become OSHA Training Institute Education Centers. Applications will be rated on a competitive basis and two organizations will be selected to participate in the project. Complete application instructions are contained in this notice.

Authority for this program may be found in sections 21 (b) and (c) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 670).

DATES: Applications must be received by February 24, 1995.

ADDRESSES: Applications must be submitted to the Division of Training and Educational Programs, Office of Training and Education, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1555 Times Drive, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ronald Mouw, Chief, Division of Training and Educational Programs, or Zigmas Sadauskas, Director, OSHA Training Institute, Office of Training and Education, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, 1555 Times Drive, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018, telephone (708) 297-4810.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Background

The OSHA Training Institute conducts 82 short-term technical training courses in OSHA standards, policies and procedures for persons responsible for enforcing or directly supporting the OSH Act, private sector employers and employees, and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA. Its primary responsibility is to the first group: Federal and State compliance officers and State consultation program staff. Private sector and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA receive training on an "as available" basis.

In recent years the demand for training has increased from all three groups. Resources of the OSHA Training Institute have not increased at a rate that can keep up with the demand. As the number of Federal and State personnel engaged in enforcement or consultation being trained has increased, opportunities for training for private sector personnel and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA have remained static or decreased.

In order to meet the increased demand for its courses, the OSHA Training Institute has selected eight educational institutions to conduct OSHA Training Institute courses for private sector personnel and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA.

These OSHA Training Institute Education Centers, which were selected through nationwide competitive processes, are: Keene State College, Manchester, New Hampshire; Niagara County Community College, Lockport, New York; West Virginia University/National Resource Center for Construction Safety and Health, Morgantown, West Virginia; Georgia Tech Research Institute, Atlanta, Georgia; Texas Engineering Extension Service/Texas Safety Association, Arlington, Texas; Maple Woods Community College, Kansas City, Missouri; Red Rocks Community College/ Trinidad State Junior College, Lakewood, Colorado; and the University of California, San Diego, California.

The OSHA Training Institute now proposes to expand the number of OSHA Training Institute Education Centers from eight to ten.

Scope

OSHA will enter into nonfinancial agreements with two colleges, universities or other nonprofit training organizations to conduct OSHA courses for private sector personnel and Federal personnel from agencies other than OSHA. The two new OSHA Training Institute Education Centers will be located in two OSHA Regions, one per region. The two OSHA Regions contain the following states.

1. Region V: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

2. Region X: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The new OSHA Training Institute Education Centers will be selected through a competitive process. This notice solicits applications from organizations interested in participating in the project.

Applicants selected to participate as OSHA Training Institute Education Centers will be expected to present six courses: four general industry OSHA courses: Course 204A, Machinery and Machine Guarding Standards; Course 501, A Guide to Voluntary Compliance in Safety and Health; Course 521, OSHA Guide to Voluntary Compliance in the Industrial Hygiene Area; and Course 600, Collateral Duty Course for Other Federal Agencies; and two constructions industry course: Course 500, Instructor Course in Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry and Course 510, Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry. Additional information about each of these courses is in the appendix to this notice.

Applicants will be selected based upon their occupational safety and health experience, their nonacademic training background, the availability of classroom and lodging facilities, and access to transportation. OSHA will support the program by providing curriculum outlines, masters of student handouts, and orientation to OSHA course presentation. OSHA also will provide assistance in presenting and/or answering questions on OSHA policy.

The project will be fifteen months in duration. OSHA will monitor each of the new OSHA Training Institute Education Centers to evaluate the effectiveness of their programs. If performance is satisfactory at the end of the fifteen-month period, OSHA will enter into a new agreement for a two-year period. Continuation of this agreement will be dependent on continued satisfactory performance and mutual interest of the parties in continuing the OSHA Training Institute Education Center program. OSHA may initiate modifications to agreements to increase or decrease the number of different OSHA courses offered by the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers.

Eligibility

Any nonprofit public or private college or university is eligible to apply. Any other nonprofit organization that can demonstrate that training or education is part of its mission and that more than 50 percent of its staff and dollar resources is devoted to training or education is also eligible to apply.

In addition to meeting the eligibility criteria, applicants must have a physical presence in the Region for which they are applying. For example, an eligible national organization based in San Francisco that has a training facility in Chicago would have a physical presence in Region V. On the other hand, a national organization based in New York City that rents hotel space to provide training at multiple sites around the county would be considered to have a physical presence only in New York and would not be qualified to apply.

A training or educational institution may elect to apply for this program in partnership with a safety and health organization that is not primarily a training organization. For example, a university could enter into an agreement with a labor union that provides for the use of university classrooms and faculty supplemented by union safety and health professionals.

If two or more organizations wish to apply as a consortium, a training or educational member of the consortium must be designated as the lead organization. OSHA will only enter into a nonfinancial agreement with the lead organization.

Financial Considerations

Organizations selected as OSHA Training Institute Education Centers will not be provided funding by OSHA to support this effort. The Centers will be expected to support their OSHA training through their normal tuition and fee structures.

Length of Project

The project will start July 1, 1995, and will run for fifteen months.

OSHA Training Institute Education Center Responsibilities

Each OSHA Training Institute Education Center will be responsible for the following.

1. Arranging to have instructors assigned to teach OSHA courses attend OSHA orientation.

2. Scheduling courses. Courses are to be scheduled on a year-round basis, with each course being offered more than once a year.

3. Publicizing the availability of courses.

4. Registering students.

5. Purchasing, or otherwise obtaining, audiovisual materials for use in courses.

6. Reproducing handouts for students.

7. Conducting courses in accordance with materials and instruction provided by OSHA.

8. Monitoring courses to ensure that OSHA course outlines are being followed.

9. Collecting course evaluation data from students in accordance with OSHA procedures.

10. Maintaining student registration and attendance records.

11. Issuing course completion certificates to students. These certificates, which must be approved by OSHA, certify that a student has completed training in a particular course.

12. Providing the OSHA Training Institute with registers of successful course completers.

13. Providing the OSHA Training Institute with a schedule showing the dates, times, and locations of every OSHA course to be offered.

14. Maintaining clearly identifiable records of tuition and/or fees collected from OSHA course students.

15. Arranging for the availability of appropriate accommodations for students.

OSHA Training Institute Responsibilities

The OSHA Training Institute will be responsible for the following.

1. Providing OSHA Training Institute Education Center instructors with orientation on how the OSHA Training Institute teaches OSHA courses.

2. Providing a detailed course outline for each OSHA course to be presented by the OSHA Training Institute Education Center.

3. Providing a master copy of the student handouts for each course to be presented.

4. Providing answers for and technical assistance on questions of OSHA policy.

5. Monitoring the performance of OSHA Training Institute Education Centers through on-site visits, including unannounced attendance at courses, and examining records of registrations, course attendance, tuition collections and personnel records concerning qualifications of staff assigned as instructors.

6. Evaluating the effectiveness of the OSHA Training Institute Education Centers.

In addition to these responsibilities, which will be included in the agreement between OSHA and the OSHA Training Institute Education Center, OSHA will make every effort to have an OSHA staff member, usually from an OSHA Regional or Area Office, available for a portion of each OSHA Training Institute Education Center training session to answer questions of OSHA policy.

Application and Selection Procedures

Eligible organizations wishing to be considered for selection as an OSHA Training Institute Education Center should prepare an application in accordance with the instructions contained in this notice.

Applications are to be submitted to the OSHA Office of Training and Education, Division of Training and Educational Programs, 1555 Times Drive, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018. The submission is to consist of one original and two copies of the application. Applications should not be bound or stapled and should only be printed on one side of the page. All applications must be received no later than 4:30 p.m. Central Standard Time, February 24, 1995.

OSHA will convene a panel of OSHA staff to review and rate the applications. Following the panel review, OSHA staff may conduct an on-site review of highly rated applicants before making a selection. The final selections will be made by the Assistant Secretary.

All applicants will be notified in writing of their selection or nonselection. It is anticipated that final selections will be made by May 26, 1995. OSHA will enter into a nonfinancial agreement with each successful applicant. The agreement will cover the responsibilities of both parties.

Appeals

There is no appeal procedure for unsuccessful applicants. Any applicant may request a copy of the documentation of its own review by writing to the OSHA Office of Training and Education, Division of Training and Educational Programs, 1555 Times Drive, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018.

Content of Applications

Each application must address each of the following points.

1. Identifying Information. Provide the name and address of the applicant organization. If the mailing address is a post office box, also provide the street address. Provide the name, title, and telephone number of the contact person who can answer questions about the application.

2. Authority to Apply. Provide a copy of the resolution by the Board of Directors, Board of Regents, or other governing body of the applicant organization approving the submittal of an application to OSHA to become an OSHA Training Institute Education Center.

3. Nonprofit Status. Include evidence of the nonprofit status of the applicant organization. A letter from the Internal Revenue Service or a statement included in a recent audit report is preferred. In the absence of either of these, a copy of the articles of incorporation showing the nonprofit status will be accepted.

4. Status as a Training Organization. This section applies only to applicants that are not colleges or universities. Show that training or education is a principal activity of the applicant organization. Through audit reports, annual reports, or other documentation, demonstrate that for the last two years more than 50 percent of the applicant's funds have been used for training and education activities and that more than 50 percent of its staff resources have also been used for this purpose.

5. Occupational Safety and Health Experience. Describe the applicant's relevant course offerings for the last two years. Include copies of catalogs and other recruitment materials that provide descriptive material about courses. For each course, include the dates the course was offered and the number of students who completed the course. Also include descriptive material similar to the information contained in the appendix: course description, objectives, topic outline, number of hours, and laboratories or other practical hands-on exercises included in the course.

6. Staff Qualifications. Describe the qualifications of staff teaching occupational safety and health courses. Indicate the professional qualifications of each, such as Certified Safety Professional (CSP), Professional Engineer (PE), or Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH). Also describe staff knowledge of and/or experience with Federal OSHA standards and their application to hazards and hazard abatement. Include resumes of current staff and position descriptions and minimum hiring qualifications for all positions, whether filled or vacant, that may be assigned to conduct OSHA classes.

7. Classroom Facilities. Describe classroom facilities available for presentations of the courses. Include number of students accommodated, desk arrangements, and availability of audiovisual equipment. Also describe appropriate laboratory facilities and other facilities available for hands-on exercises. Indicate provisions for accessibility for persons with disabilities.

8. Recruitment and Registration. Explain procedures for recruiting students from Federal agencies other than OSHA and from the private sector. Describe registration procedures including provisions for cancellation, furnishing enrollees with hotel information, and tuition or fee collection.

9. Accomodations. Provide a representative listing of hotels available for student accommodation and give sample room rates. Explain how students will be transported between the hotels and classes. Also describe the food service and restaurants available both in the area in which the classes will be held and the area where the hotels are located.

10. Location. Describe the accessibility of the training facility for students. Include such items as distance from a major airport, number of airlines serving the airport, transportation from the airport to hotels, and distance from the interstate system. Also describe the proximity of the training facility to the nearest OSHA Regional or Area Office, including the distance, and giving the approximate driving or other travel time.

11. Tuition. Provide a copy of the applicant organization's tuition and fee schedule. Explain how tuition and/or fees will be computed for each course, referencing the schedule.

12. Nondiscrimination. Provide copies of the applicant organization's nondiscrimination policies covering staff and students. In the absence of a written policy, explain how the applicant will ensure that staff and students are selected without regard to race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability.

13. Off-site Courses. Successful applicants will be expected to conduct courses at sites other than their own facilities at the request of organizations sponsoring training. Explain the procedures that will be used to assure that classroom facilities and accommodations, if appropriate, are adequate and that instructional staff, if different from those individuals included in item 6 above, Staff Qualifications, meet the hiring standards included in that item.

Review Criteria

A panel of OSHA staff will review the applications. It will consider each of the factors listed below.

1. Occupational Safety and Health Training Experience a. Evidence that occupational safety and health training or education has been an ongoing program of the applicant organization. Reviewers will examine the number of different occupational safety and health courses offered by the applicant organization over the past two years, the length of the courses, the number of students completing each course, and the number of times each course was offered. Successful applicants will also include samples of course announcements.

b. Qualifications of personnel teaching occupational safety and health courses. These include academic training in occupational safety and health subjects, experience with the application of Federal OSHA standards to hazards and hazard abatement, professional certification, practical experience in the field of occupational safety and health, and training experience. Training experience is defined as experience in training workers or managers in nonacademic situations.

2. Adequacy of Training Facilities. Potential for accommodating classes of 25 to 40 students on a year-round basis in settings comparable to those of the OSHA Training Institute. Items considered will include classroom layout, e.g., desks or tables for students, availability of audiovisual equipment, reproduction facilities for handouts, and availability of appropriate laboratory and/or hands-on facilities. Accessibility for persons with disabilities will also be considered.

3. Recruitment and Registration Procedures. Reasonableness of the applicant's procedures for recruiting and registering students. Methods of reaching potential students, ease of registration, provisions for cancellations, and system for informing students of available accommodations and materials necessary for the course, if any, are among the items that will be reviewed.

4. Accommodations and Location. Availability of lodging and restaurant facilities, access to nationwide transportation and proximity to an OSHA Area or Regional Office. Accommodations, preferably national hotel/motel chains, and restaurants should be reasonably prices and should be within a few miles of the training facility. A major airport with regular service to all parts of the Region should be within a reasonable driving time from the hotel and training locations. Interstate highways should also be within reasonable distance. The nearest OSHA Office should be within one hour's travel time of the principal training site to facilitate OSHA participation in training sessions.

5. Tuition. Conformance of proposed tuition and/or fees with the established policies of the applicant and reasonableness of the charges.

6. Nondiscrimination. Adherence of the applicant's policies with Federal requirements.

7. Off-site Courses. Experience and/or ability of the applicant to conduct courses at sites other than its own facility.

Proposal Conferences

The OSHA Office of Training and Education will hold two proposal conferences. These are intended to provide potential applicants with information about the OSHA Training Institute, OSHA Training Institute courses and methods of instruction, and administrative requirements for OSHA Training Institute Education Centers. The conference in Des Plaines, Illinois, will also include a tour of the OSHA Training Institute. The conferences will also feature question and answer sessions about the documentation expected in applications.

The proposal conferences will be held from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. One conference will be held on January 17, 1995, at the OSHA Office of Training and Education, 1555 Times Drive, Des Plaines, Illinois 60018. The other conference will be held on January 19, 1995, at the OSHA Regional Office, Room 850, 1111 Third Avenue, Seattle, Washington 98101. Persons interested in attending one of these conferences should contact Ronald Mouw, Chief, Division of Training and Educational Programs, or Helen Beall, Training Specialist, at (708) 297-4810 to obtain information about local hotel accommodations and transportation. It is not necessary to register for the conferences.

Signed at Washington, DC, this 7th day of December, 1994.

Joseph A. Dear,

Assistant Secretary of Labor.

Appendix

Course 204A, Machinery and Machine Guarding Standards

1. Course description. The course provides the student with an overview of various types of common machinery and related safety standards. The course provides guidance in recognizing hazards such as those created by points of operation, ingoing nip points, rotating parts, and flying chips or sparks, and provides some options to achieve abatement. A field trip is provided to enhance students' knowledge of machine guarding standards. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.5 CEU's for this course.

2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Identify various machines and their functions;

b. Identify common machinery hazards;

c. Recommend selected abatement methods; and

d. Select the appropriate OSHA standard that applies to a hazard.

3. Course topics:

a. Introduction, pretest and pretest review, posttest and posttest review -- 2 hours.

b. Hazards and standards workshop and review -- 2 hours. In this workshop, written hazard conditions are researched, and standards are reviewed and referenced. Oral review also incorporates policy relating to specific conditions.

c. Inspection field trip to machine shop operations and inspection writeup -- 6 hours.

The class is taken to facilities with extensive and varied metalworking and woodworking operations following the discussions of machinery, terminology, and 29 CFR 1910.211-1910.219. It exposes the students to operations including lathes, mills, boring machines, screw machines, woodworking machines, mechanical power presses, and power transmission apparatus. Students are given an opportunity to apply hazard recognition concepts on a site inspection at an operating facility with a variety of machine operations. They evaluate and document any machinery and machine guarding hazards, then return to the classroom to research the standards for citation references. They present an oral report on their findings.

d. Review of 29 CFR part 1910, subpart O, machinery and machine guarding concepts -- 1 hour.

e. Review of 29 CFR 1910.211 and 29 CFR 1910.312, definitions, guarding and devices, general requirements -- 2 hours.

f. 29 CFR subpart J, 1910.147, control of hazardous energy sources (lockout/tagout), and 29 CFR subpart S, 1910.332 - 1910.335, electrical safety-related work practices -- 2 hours.

g. 29 CFR subpart P, 1910.242 - 1910.244, portable powered tools -- 1 hour.

h. 29 CFR 1910.212 and section 5(a)(1) of the OSH Act, robotic safeguarding -- 1 hour.

i. 29 CFR 1910.213, woodworking machinery requirements -- 2 hours.

j. 29 CFR 1910.215, abrasive wheel machinery -- 1 hour.

k. 29 CFR 1910.216, mills and calenders -- 1 hour.

l. 29 CFR 1910.217, mechanical power presses -- 2 hours.

m. 29 CFR 1910.218, forging machines -- 1 hour.

n. 29 CFR 1910.219, power transmission apparatus -- 1 hour.

Course 500, Basic Instructor Course in Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry

1. Course description. The course is designed for students in the private sector who are interested in teaching the 10- and 30-hour construction safety and health outreach program to their employees and other interested groups. Special emphasis is placed upon those topics that are required in the 10- and 30-hour programs as well as on those that are the most hazardous, using OSHA standards as a guide. Course participants are briefed on effective instructional approaches and the effective use of visual aids and handouts. This course allows the student to conduct both a 10-hour and a 30-hour construction safety and health course and to issue OSHA cards to participants certifying course completion. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.5 CEU's for this course.

2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Define construction terms found in OSHA standards;

b. Present effective safety and health training programs in accordance with OSHA construction standards, regulations, and guidelines;

c. Identify hazards and determine appropriate standards

d. Prepare reports citing the conditions found; and

e. Identify methods to abate hazards.

3. Course topics:

a. Introduction, pretest and pretest review, overview of the OSH Act and OSHA, introduction to OSHA standards, posttest and posttest review -- 4 hours.

b. Safety programs, inspections, targeting and penalties -- 1 hour.

c. Training techniques -- 2 hours.

d. 29 CFR part 1904, recordkeeping -- 1 hour.

e. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart D, hazard communication -- 1 hour.

f. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart E, health hazards in construction and personal protective equipment -- 3 hours.

g. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart F, fire protection and prevention -- 1 hour.

h. 29 CFR part 1926, subparts G, O and W, motor vehicles -- 1 hour.

i. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart H, rigging -- 1 hour.

j. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart I, tools -- 1 hour.

k. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart K, electrical -- 2 hours.

l. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart L, scaffolds -- 2 hours.

m. 29 CFR part 1926, subparts M and X, walking and working surfaces and ladders -- 1 hour.

n. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart N, cranes -- 1 hour.

o. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart P, trenching -- 2 hours.

p. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart Q, concrete -- 1 hour.

Course 501, A Guide to Voluntary Compliance in Safety and Health

1. Course description. This course is intended for private sector personnel from all types of industries. It presents detailed information on how the provisions of the OSH Act may be implemented in the workplace. The primary focus is on the basics of the Act. The course includes an introduction to general industry standards and provides an overview of the requirements of the more frequently referenced standards. Segments of the course cover rights and responsibilities under the Act, contested citations, recordkeeping, and Voluntary Protection Programs. Successful completion of the course qualifies the student to conduct both a 10-hour and a 30-hour voluntary compliance course and to issue OSHA cards to participants certifying course completion. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.5 CEU's for this course.

2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Locate OSHA safety and health standards, policies, and procedures;

b. Describe the use of OSHA standards and regulations to supplement an on-going safety and health program;

c. Identify common violations of OSHA standards;

d. Describe appropriate abatement procedures for selected safety hazards; and

e. Describe how to conduct internal training on OSHA regulations.

3. Course topics:

a. Pretest and review, posttest and review, and overview of the training outreach program -- 2 hours.

b. Introduction to OSHA standards and hazard violation workshop -- 2 hours.

The hazard violation workshop introduces the students to the format of the OSHA standards. They are shown how the numbering system works, then must identify the applicable standard for approximately 40 hazardous conditions.

c. Overview of the OSH Act and 29 CFR 1903, inspections, citations and proposed penalties -- 2 hours.

d. 29 CFR part 1904 -- recordkeeping -- 1 hour.

e. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart D, walking and working surfaces -- 2 hours.

f. 29 CFR part 1910, subparts E and L, means of egress and fire protection -- 2 hours.

g. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart H, hazardous materials -- 2 hours.

h. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart I, personal protective equipment -- 1 hour.

i. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart J, lockout/tagout -- 1/2 hour.

j. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart N, material handling -- 1 hour.

k. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart O, machine guarding -- 2 hours.

l. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Q, welding -- 2 hours.

m. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart S, electrical standards and work practices -- 2 1/2 hours.

n. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Z, hazard communication -- 1 1/2 hours.

o. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Z, introduction to industrial hygiene -- 1 1/2 hours.

Course 510, Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry

1. Course description. This course for private sector personnel covers OSHA policies, procedures, and standards, as well as construction safety and health principles. Topics include scope and application of the OSHA construction standards. Special emphasis is placed on those areas that are the most hazardous, using OSHA standards as a guide. Upon successful course completion, the student will receive an OSHA construction safety and health 30-hour course completion card. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.5 CEU's for this course.

2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Recognize various construction processes, materials, and equipment;

b. Identify the common hazards found in many areas of construction;

c. Find the correct OSHA standards in 29 CFR part 1926; and

d. Recommend abatement techniques for hazards found in construction.

3. Course topics:

a. Introduction, pretest and pretest review, overview of the OSH Act and OSHA, introduction to OSHA standards, posttest and posttest review -- 3 hours.

b. Confined space entry -- 1 hour.

c. 29 CFR part 1904, recordkeeping -- 1 hour.

d. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart C -- general safety and health provisions -- 1 hour.

e. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart D, hazard communication -- 1 hour.

f. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart E, health hazards in construction and personal protective equipment -- 2 hours.

g. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart F, fire protection and prevention -- 1 hour.

h. 29 CFR part 1926, subparts G, O and W, motor vehicles -- 1 hour.

i. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart H, rigging -- 1 hour.

j. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart I, tools -- 1 hour.

k. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart J, welding -- 1 hour.

l. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart K, electrical -- 1 hour.

m. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart L, scaffolds -- 1 hour.

n. 29 CFR part 1926, subparts M and X, walking and working surfaces and ladders -- 2 hours.

o. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart N, cranes -- 1 hour.

p. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart P, trenching -- 1 hour.

q. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart Q, concrete -- 1 hour.

r. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart R, steel erection -- 1 hour.

s. 29 CFR part 1926, subpart S, underground construction -- 1 hour.

t. 29 CFR part 1926, subparts T and U -- demolition and blasting -- 2 hours.

Course 521, OSHA Guide to Voluntary Compliance in the Industrial Hygiene Area

1. Course description. This course is designed for private sector personnel who are interested in increasing their knowledge of industrial hygiene practices and related OSHA regulations and procedures. Topics covered include permissible exposure limits, OSHA health standards, respiratory protection, engineering controls, hazard communication, sampling instrumentation, and workplace health program elements. There are workshops in health hazard recognition, safety and health program elements, and the use of OSHA standards. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.5 CEU's for this course.

2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Interpret requirements of OSHA health standards;

b. Recognize potential health hazards in the workplace;

c. Perform basic health hazard evaluation using OSHA sampling procedures;

d. Recommend acceptable strategies for controlling hazardous conditions;and

e. Describe the elements required for an effective workplace health protection program.

3. Course topics:

a. Course opening and course closing -- 1 hour.

b. Air contaminant sampling -- 2 hours.

c. Compliance with air contaminant standards -- 2 hours.

d. Compliance with hazard communication -- 1 1/2 hours.

e. Compliance with hazardous waste standards -- 2 hours.

f. Compliance with the asbestos standard -- 1 hour.

g. Compliance with the bloodborne disease standard -- 1 hour.

h. Compliance with the confined space standard -- 1 hour.

i. Compliance with the noise standard -- 2 hours.

j. Compliance with the respirator standard -- 2 hours.

k. Compliance with ventilation standards -- 2 hours.

l. Detector tube sampling -- 1 hour.

m. Elements of a workplace health program and safety and health program workshop -- 1 1/2 hours.

Students are presented with the elements of a workplace health program and draft a safety and health program for their own workplaces.

n. Hazard violation workshop -- 1 hour. Students are presented written workplace scenarios describing hazards and are to determine which OSHA health standards apply and why.

o. Health hazard recognition -- 1 hour.

p. Health hazard slide workshop -- 1 hour.

Students are shown slides depicting health hazards and asked to identify the hazards.

q. OSHA ergonomic guidelines -- 1 hour.

r. OSHA recordkeeping for health -- 1 hour.

Course 600, Collateral Duty Course for Other Federal Agencies

1. Course description. This course introduces Federal agency collateral duty (part-time) safety and health personnel to the OSH Act, Executive Order 12196, 29 CFR part 1960, and 29 CFR part 1910. It enables them to recognize basic safety and health hazards in their own workplaces, and to effectively assist agency safety and health officers with inspection and abatement efforts. A mock workplace inspection is conducted and student findings are reviewed. The OSHA Training Institute awards 2.2 CEU's for this course. 2. Course objectives. Students completing this course should be able to:

a. Describe the OSH Act, 29 CFR 1960, and 29 CFR 1910;

b. Describe major provisions of Executive Order 12196;

c. Identify selected safety and health hazards and the corresponding OSHA standards;

d. Describe abatement methods for selected safety and health hazards;

e. Explain and apply workplace inspection procedures consistent with established OSHA policies, procedure, and directives.

3. Course topics:

a. Course opening, pretest and review, posttest and review, and course closing -- 1 hour.

b. Hazard communication -- 1 hour.

c. Inspection field trip, writeup and review -- 5 hours.

Students are introduced to the process of site inspection, i.e., what hazardous conditions or activities may be observed in the work environment. They are taken to an active government facility, and evaluate and document any observed hazards. After returning to the classroom, they research and select the standards applicable to the observed hazards. Presentations of findings are made to the class.

d. Introduction to accident investigation -- 1 hour. e. Introduction to the OSH Act, Executive Order 12196, and 29 CFR part 1960 -- 2 hours.

f. Introduction to OSHA standards and hazard violation workshop and review -- 2 hours.

The hazard violation workshop introduces the students to the format of the OSHA standards. They are shown how the numbering system works, then must identify the applicable standard for approximately 40 hazardous conditions.

g. Office safety -- 1 hour.

h. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart D, walking and working surfaces -- 1 hour.

i. 29 CFR part 1910, subparts E and L, means of egress and fire protection -- 1 hour.

j. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart H, hazardous materials -- 1 hour.

k. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart I, personal protective equipment -- 1 hour.

l. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart N, material handling -- 1 hour.

m. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart O, machine guarding and portable tools -- 1 hour.

n. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Q, welding, cutting and brazing -- 1 hour.

o. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart S, electrical standards -- 1 hour.

p. 29 CFR part 1910, subpart Z, introduction to industrial hygiene -- 1 hour.

[FR Doc. 94-30572 Filed 12-12-94; 8:45 am]


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