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Accident Report Detail

Accident: 201350485 - Electric Shock & Burn - Contact With Overhead Line

Accident: 201350485 -- Report ID: 0419700 -- Event Date: 03/10/1998
InspectionOpen DateSICEstablishment Name
30102308103/11/19981731Olson Electric Company Inc.
Two power line workers were working from an insulated aerial lift, installing armor rods on a 240-kilovolt overhead power line. One of the employees, a supervisor, was using a live-line tool to install the armor rods. The tool contacted the concrete pole and the ground wire hanging from the top of the pole, and current arced from the power line. (The ground wire was connected to the static wire on top of the pole.) The employee holding the live-line tool was electrocuted. His coworker received an electric shock and sustained second- and third-degree burns when the aerial lift burst into flames. He was hospitalized for his injuries.
Keywords: burn, electric arc, overhead power line, electrical, power line worker, electrocuted, live-line tool, e ptd, elec utility work, aerial lift
End Use Proj Type Proj Cost Stories NonBldgHt Fatality
Powerline, transmission line Alteration or rehabilitation $50,000 to $250,000 75 X
Employee # Inspection Age Sex Degree Nature Occupation Construction
1 301023081 Fatality Electric Shock Electrical power installers and repairers FallDist:
FallHt:
Cause: Installing equipment (HVAC and other)
FatCause: Electrocution from equipment installation/tool use
2 301023081 Hospitalized injury Electric Shock Electrical power installers and repairers FallDist:
FallHt:
Cause: Installing equipment (HVAC and other)
FatCause: Electrocution from equipment installation/tool use

Accident: 200000453 - Electric Shock - Contact With Overhead Line Thru Armor Rod

Accident: 200000453 -- Report ID: 0728500 -- Event Date: 11/11/1997
InspectionOpen DateSICEstablishment Name
30000649111/12/19971623Irby Construction Co.
A power line crew was installing all dielectric self-supporting fiber-optic cable onto structures supporting an existing 69-kilovolt overhead power line. As part of the project, the crew reinforced the existing structures and installed the fiber-optic cable. To install the cable, the crew would hang sheaves, use a pulling rope to pull the cable through the sheaves, and permanently attach the cable to the structure. The employees would reinforce the existing structures by replacing some poles, installing additional cross braces below the power line, and installing supporting braces above the crossarm. The employees worked with the power line energized some of the time and deenergized at other times. The employer relied on employee work practices to avoid violating the minimum approach distance when the line was energized. However, because of the placement of the braces and fiber-optic cable, maintaining the minimum approach distance was not possible on most structures. One of the employees was completing the task of clipping in the fiber-optic cable on a two-pole structure while the power line was energized. The employee was attaching the cable to the structure with a housing that included a rubber boot and reinforcing rods. As the employee was wrapping the rods around the cable, one of the rods got stuck. When he jerked on the 1.8-meter-long rod to free it, it passed too close to the power line, and current arced to the rod. The employee was electrocuted and set on fire by the electric arc. His coworkers conducted pole-top rescue, lowered him to the ground, and administered cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. Their efforts were to no avail as the injured employee was pronounced dead at the scene.
Keywords: electric arc, overhead power line, electrical, armor rod, power line worker, stuck, electrocuted, e ptd, elec utility work
End Use Proj Type Proj Cost Stories NonBldgHt Fatality
Powerline, transmission line New project or new addition $1,000,000 to $5,000,000 45 X
Employee # Inspection Age Sex Degree Nature Occupation Construction
1 300006491 Fatality Other Electrical power installers and repairers FallDist:
FallHt:
Cause: Temporary work (buildings, facilities)
FatCause: Electrocution by equipment contacting wire

Accident: 596304 - Burn - Electrical Fault On Overhead Power Line

Accident: 596304 -- Report ID: 0418400 -- Event Date: 04/19/1995
InspectionOpen DateSICEstablishment Name
10644769104/19/19954911Savannah Electric And Power Co.
A contractor had previously set a new utility pole next to an existing pole. Both wood poles were 65 feet in length. However, the contractor had set the replacement pole so that its top was about 28 inches below the old pole. On the day of the accident, three employees (two power line workers and one apprentice) climbed the pole, and two workers remained on the ground. The crew covered the 115-kilovolt overhead power line, transferred the overhead ground wire, installed the pole ground wire, and cut off a portion of the old pole. The crew then installed a temporary crossarm at the top of the new pole to enable them to lift the phase conductors. The crew decided to transfer the bottom conductor first. A new 6-foot-long, metal davit arm was installed on the new pole to support the bottom conductor. After installation, the davit arm was only about 26 inches from the energized conductor. The crew attached lifting blocks to the temporary crossarm and to a 4-foot lifting stick. The lifting stick was attached to the bottom phase conductor near the suspension insulator. The next step in the procedure was to pull the cotter key at the bottom of the insulator string to release the conductor. The apprentice power line worker was using an 8-foot-long A. B. Chance tie stick with a key puller attachment to remove the cotter key from the insulator string. The cotter key was facing away from the pole, and the employee was having difficulty removing it. The other power line worker had a live-line tool to turn the bottom bell. The clearance between the metal end of the lifting stick that was in contact with the energized phase conductor and the metal davit arm, which was at ground potential, was estimated to be about 12 to 14 inches. An arc-over occurred between the conductor and the metal davit arm, and fault current passing through the pole ground melted it and caused further arcing. The two power line workers lost consciousness. The apprentice line worker shook one of his unconscious coworkers, who quickly regained consciousness. The apprentice then patted out the flames of the burning tee-shirt on his other coworker, began pole-top rescue procedures on him, and lowered him to the ground. The apprentice and the other power line worker then descended the pole. A total of five employees were transported to a hospital. Two employees on the ground had rope burns on their hands from lowering the injured employee. The three employees on the pole had second- and third-degree burns and were hospitalized for their injuries.
Keywords: burn, clothing, electric arc, overhead power line, electrical, power line worker, live-line tool, e ptd, elec utility work, electrical fault
Employee # Inspection Age Sex Degree Nature Occupation
1 106447691 Non Hospitalized injury Bruise/Contus/Abras Laborers, except construction
2 106447691 Hospitalized injury Burn/Scald(Heat) Electrical power installers and repairers
3 106447691 Hospitalized injury Burn/Scald(Heat) Electrical power installers and repairers
4 106447691 Hospitalized injury Burn/Scald(Heat) Electrical power installers and repairers
5 106447691 Non Hospitalized injury Bruise/Contus/Abras Laborers, except construction

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