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Region 6


Please note: As of January 20, 2017, information in some news releases may be out of date or not reflect current policies.

Jan. 8, 2015

Metal fuel-tank fabricator exposes workers
to falls, unguarded machinery and other hazards
OSHA cites Transition of Superior Systems for 25 serious violations; fines total $51,600

LUBBOCK, Texas – Working at an industrial facility is dangerous. An employer who ignores serious hazards and puts workers in harm's way threatens everyone's well-being, a point not lost on U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigators who identified 25 serious safety and health violations after a July 2014 inspection at Transition of Superior Systems in Merkel. Fines totaled $51,600.

As part of its Regional Emphasis Program of Fabricated Metals*, OSHA's Lubbock Area Office found that the metal fuel-tank fabricator failed to provide safeguards for air compressor pulleys and belts, grinders and plate rollers. Several fall hazards also existed, including an open loft area without a gate or chain; failure to prevent falls; and a missing stair rail leading to a cement mixer.

"Safety and health in the workplace is not a luxury-it's the law. When an employer like Transition of Superior Systems fails to find and fix hazards, a worker's livelihood and life are at risk. OSHA will never tolerate such negligence," said Elizabeth Linda Routh, OSHA's area director in Lubbock.

Other serious hazards include unsafe storage of flammable liquids; keeping forklifts needing repair in service; covering live electrical wires; and using frayed electrical cords rather than repairing or replacing them. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Transition of Superior Systems has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and proposed penalties to comply, request a conference with OSHA's area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

To ask questions, obtain compliance assistance, file a complaint or report workplace hospitalizations, fatalities or situations posing imminent danger to workers, the public should call OSHA's toll-free hotline at 800-321-OSHA (6742) or the agency's Lubbock District Office at 806-472-7681.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA's role is to ensure these conditions for America's working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit http://www.osha.gov.

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Media Contacts:

Diana Petterson, 972-850-4710, petterson.diana@dol.gov
Juan Rodriguez, 972-850-4709, rodriguez.juan@dol.gov

Release Number: 14-2333-DAL


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