<< Back to Chemical Sampling Information

Chemical Sampling Information (CSI)
Search (use word(s)/phrase)
Table of Contents
By Name
A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

By CAS Number
Quick Links

General Description

Synonyms: Elemental zinc, Zinc dust, Zinc powder

OSHA IMIS Code Number: Z100

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Number: 7440-66-6

Department of Transportation Regulation Number (49 CFR 172.101) and 2012 Emergency Response Guidebook [4 MB PDF, 392 pages]: 1436 138

NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards - Zinc: Acute hazards, symptoms, physical and chemical dangers, physical properties, and more



Exposure Limits and Health Effects

Exposure Limit

Limit Values

HE Codes

Health Factors and Target Organs

OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) - General Industry

Not established

 

 

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Recommended Exposure Limit (REL)

Not established

 

 

American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) Threshold Limit Value (TLV)

Not established

 

 

CAL/OSHA PEL

Not established

 

 

National Toxicology Program (NTP) carcinogenic classification: Not listed

International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC): Not listed

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) carcinogenic classification: Not classifiable as to human carcinogenicity

EPA Inhalation Reference Concentration (RfC): Not established

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Inhalation Minimal Risk Level (MRL): Not established

NIOSH Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) concentration: Not established

Notes on Other Potential Health Effects and Hazards

  1. Zinc powder is highly flammable, and many reactions may cause fire or explosion (NIOSH/IPCS 1994).
  2. Metal fume fever may be the result of inhalation of zinc dust or zinc fumes (ATSDR 2005). Victims of metal fume fever may present with nausea and vomiting, chills and fever, muscular aches and pains, and weakness (Gossel and Bricker 1994).
  3. High levels of zinc in the body may result in a copper deficiency (ATSDR 2005).
  4. Zinc may cause dermatitis following prolonged skin exposure (NIOSH/IPCS 1994).

Date last revised: 09/06/2012

Literature Basis

  • ATSDR: Toxicological Profile for Zinc [4 MB PDF, 352 pages]. 2005.
  • Gossel, T.A. and J.D. Bricker: Principles of Clinical Toxicology. 3rd ed. New York, NY: Raven Press, Ltd., p. 202, 1994.
  • NIOSH/IPCS: International Chemical Safety Cards - Zinc. October 1994.
Monitoring Methods used by OSHA

Laboratory Sampling/Analytical Method:
  • sampling media: Mixed Cellulose Ester Filter (MCEF) 0.8 micron
    maximum volume: 960 Liters
    minimum volume:
    480 Liters
    maximum flow rate:
    2.0 L/min
    current analytical method: Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy; AAS
    method reference: 2 (OSHA ID-121)
    sampling analytical error: 0.14
    method classification: Fully Validated
    alternate analytical method: Inductively Coupled Argon Plasma; ICP/DCP-AES
    method reference: 2 (OSHA ID-125G)
    sampling analytical error: 0.12
    method classification: Fully Validated

** All Trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

Accessibility Assistance: Contact the OSHA Directorate of Technical Support and Emergency Management at (202) 693-2300 for assistance accessing PDF materials.