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Slide 11

    TEXT VERSION OF SLIDE:

    Title: Injury and Illness Prevention Programs: Who Is Using Them?
    Type: Text Slide
    Content:

    • 34 U.S. states require or encourage injury and illness prevention programs
      • 15 states have mandatory regulations
      • Other states have financial incentives, including workers comp premium reductions
      • 16 states have voluntary guidance, consultation, and training

    Speaker Notes:

    There are thousands of other employers across the United States who, like Anthony Forest Products, have implemented injury and illness prevention programs. Many are in one of the 34 U.S. states that already require or encourage injury and illness prevention programs. In 15 of these states such programs are mandatory.

    Other states, while not requiring programs, have created financial incentives for employers to implement injury and illness prevention programs. In some instances this involves providing – or facilitating – workers' compensation insurance premium reductions for employers who establish programs meeting specified requirements. And 16 states, in all three of these groups, provide an array of voluntary guidance, consultation and training programs, and other assistance aimed at helping and encouraging employers to implement injury and illness prevention programs.

    These state requirements and incentives are effective. OSHA examined the injury and illness prevention programs in eight states where the state had either required a program or provided incentives or requirements through its workers' compensation programs. These state programs lowered injury and illness incidences by anywhere from 9 percent to more than 60 percent.

    OSHA also examined fatality rates and found that California, Hawaii and Washington, with their mandatory injury and illness prevention program requirements, had workplace fatality rates as much as 31 percent below the national average in 2009.