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    TEXT VERSION OF SLIDE:

    Title: Anthony Forestry Products: Small Business Success Story
    Type: 3 Chart Slide

    Chart Title: Payroll ($M)
    Chart Type: Bar Graph
    Content: Includes 7 elements by year for 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.
    • 1998 = approximately $1.7 Million
    • 1999 = approximately $1.8 Million
    • 2003 = approximately $1.9 Million
    • 2004 = approximately $2 Million
    • 2005 = approximately $2.1 Million
    • 2006 = approximately $2.2 Million
    • 2007 = approximately $2.3 Million

    Chart Title: Losses ($000)
    Chart Type: Bar Graph
    Content: Includes 7 elements by year for 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.
    • 1998 = approximately $32,500
    • 1999 = approximately $26,000
    • 2003 = approximately $6,000
    • 2004 = approximately $2,000
    • 2005 = approximately $0
    • 2006 = approximately $3,000
    • 2007 = approximately $2,000

    Chart Title: Losses per $1,000 of Payroll
    Chart Type: Line Chart
    Content: Includes 7 elements by year for 1998, 1999, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007.
    • 1998 = $18.20
    • 1999 = $14.20
    • 2003 = $3.90
    • 2004 = $0.30
    • 2005 = $0.00
    • 2006 = $0.70
    • 2007 = $0.30

    Speaker Notes:

    Let's take a look at one small business success story:

    Anthony Forestry Products is a fourth generation, family-owned lumber and wood products company. Its laminated wood products plant in El Dorado, AR, employs 80 workers.

    The company initiated efforts to improve its safety practices and, in 2001, began working with OSHA's On-Site Consultation Program on a voluntary basis to put in place an injury and illness prevention program.

    By 2002, the site was accepted into the Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), which recognizes small employers who operate an exemplary SHMS. The results can be seen in this series of three charts.

    • Top left, you see the company's payroll growing from about $1.6 in 1998 to $2.3 in 2007.
    • Initially, prior to starting the program, the company's workers compensation losses (top right) were quite high over $30,000 in 1998 and over $25,000 in 1999. By 2003, two years after starting their program, they had decreased to around $6,000 and they continued to fall.
    • The chart on the bottom shows the trend in their "loss rate." This is their losses per $100 of payroll) and you can see the dramatic decrease. Even as their payroll was increasing, their losses per $1,000 of payroll was decreasing, from $18.20 per $1,000 in 1998 to $0.03 per $1,000 in 2007.